Enterics Nov 5 without questions-2010

Enterics Nov 5 without questions-2010 - ENTERIC ORGANISMS...

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Unformatted text preview: ENTERIC ORGANISMS AND INFECTIONS I Jorge A. Giron, Ph.D. Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology & Emerging Pathogens Institute jagiron@ufl.edu 273 88 92 Diarrheal Diseases World Health Organization (WHO) estimates in endemic areas: 1,650 million cases of diarrhea per year adults, children, & travelers to these areas (military) mal nutrition child under development economic loss 6 million deaths in children under 5y old In the U.S. 76,000,000 cases each year most don't see a doctor. Objectives Know major enteric pathogens and how they produce disease Define major virulence factors Know most common bacterial preformed toxins responsible for food poisoning Understand the epidemiology of enteric infections Enteric Pathogens Outline for next 3 Enterics Lectures Intestinal Normal Flora Etiologies of Diarrheal Disease Bacterial Infection vs. Pre-formed toxin Disease due to ingestion of pre-formed toxins Stages of pathogenesis for infections Infections due to toxigenic bacteria Infections due to invasive bacteria Non-invasive diarrheagenic E. coli Helicobacter pylori - Gastric and duodenal ulcer Health: natural balance Environment (Macro & micro) Normal Flora Host What happens when a pathogen comes along and wants to play? + Pathogen Environment Normal Flora Host 1. Clearance 2. Asymptomatic carriage 3. Development of symptoms: disease.DEATH! Outcome will be determined by the hosts defenses and bacterial fitness Infectious disease: breaking the balance Environment Environment Pathogen Host HIV Cancer Diabetes Cystic fibrosis Abuse of antibiotics Individuals most susceptible to infections when defenses are down Small infants may not have developed immune system and older people may have compromised defenses Mix bacterial population of - non-pathogenic - Commensal or Indigenous bacteria present in various body sites in healthy individual Normal Flora (The Good Bacteria) Varies from site to site due to local conditions: pH nutrients divalent ions ammonia bile lysozyme Normal Flora Composition Varies from host to host due to: age gender diet hygiene genetics culture/religion social (sexual) habits Normal Flora Composition Provides protection against harmful bacteria (competence, producing acidic niche, antibiotics) However, it can be a source of potential (opportunistic) pathogens!...
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This note was uploaded on 07/30/2011 for the course MMC 6500 taught by Professor Gulig during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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Enterics Nov 5 without questions-2010 - ENTERIC ORGANISMS...

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