Chap27_PHY2049_incomplete

Chap27_PHY2049_incomplete - Chapter 27 Magnetic Field and...

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Chapter 27 – Magnetic Field and Magnetic Forces - Magnetism - Magnetic Field - Magnetic Field Lines and Magnetic Flux - Motion of Charged Particles in a Magnetic Field - Applications of Motion of Charged Particles - Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor - Force and Torque on a Current Loop - The Direct-Current Motor - The Hall effect
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1) A moving charge or collection of moving charges (e.g. electric current) produces a magnetic field. (Chap. 28). 2) A second current or charge responds to the magnetic field and experiences a magnetic force. (Chap. 27). 1. Magnetism Permanent magnets: exert forces on each other as well as on unmagnetized Fe pieces. - The needle of a compass is a piece of magnetized Fe. - If a bar-shaped permanent magnet is free to rotate, one end points north (north pole of magnet). - An object that contains Fe is not by itself magnetized, it can be attracted by either the north or south pole of permanent magnet. - A bar magnet sets up a magnetic field in the space around it and a second body responds to that field. A compass needle tends to align with the magnetic field at the needle’s position.
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1. Magnetism - Magnets exert forces on each other just like charges. You can draw magnetic field lines just like you drew electric field lines. - Magnetic north and south pole’s behavior is not unlike electric charges. For magnets, like poles repel and opposite poles attract. - A permanent magnet will attract a metal like iron with either the north or south pole.
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Magnetic poles about our planet
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observed monopoles in electricity. A (+) or (-) alone was stable, and field lines could be drawn around it. - Magnets cannot exist as monopoles. If you break a bar magnet between N and S poles, you get two smaller magnets, each with its own N and S pole. Magnetic declination / magnetic variation: the Earth’s magnetic axis is not parallel to its geographic axis (axis of rotation) b a compass reading deviates from geographic north. Magnetic inclination: the magnetic field is not horizontal at most of earth’s surface, its angle up or down. The magnetic field is vertical at magnetic poles. Magnetic Poles versus Electric Charge
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Chap27_PHY2049_incomplete - Chapter 27 Magnetic Field and...

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