f98u2le1 - Satellite Oceanography Lesson I Satellite...

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1998 Project Oceanography Fall Series 1 Unit II Satellite Oceanography Satellite Oceanography Lesson I. Satellite Oceanography Overview The goal of this unit is to give a basic overview of satellite oceanography, its uses and applications. Key words : satellite, global climate, ocean circulation, altimetry, and sea level measurements Covering about seventy percent of the Earth's surface, the oceans are central to the continued existence of life on our planet. The oceans are where life first appeared on Earth. The largest creatures on Earth (whales) and the smallest (bacteria and viruses) live in the oceans. We rely on the ocean for many things, including: food, water transportation, recreation, minerals and energy. Oceans store energy. When ocean currents change, they cause changes in global weather patterns and can cause droughts, floods and storms. However, our knowledge of our oceans is limited. Ships, coastlines, and islands provide places from which we can observe, sample, and study small portions of oceans. But we can only look at a very small part of the global ocean this way. We need a better place from which to study oceans. Space provides this place. Satellites circling the Earth can survey an entire ocean in less than an hour. These satellites can "look" at clouds to study the weather, or at the sea surface (when it's not cloudy) to measure the sea's surface temperature, wave heights and direction of waves. Some satellites use radar to "look" through the clouds at the sea surface. One other important characteristic that we can see from space is the color of the ocean. Changes in the color of ocean water over time or across a distance on the surface provide valuable information. In this series of programs, we will discover satellite imaging, TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry , the view of the ocean from the space shuttle, measuring currents from space, marine mammal tracking and tracking El Niño.
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1998 Project Oceanography Fall Series 2 Unit II Satellite Oceanography Satellite Oceanography What is a Satellite? A satellite is any object that orbits or revolves around any other object. For instance, the moon is a satellite of the Earth and the Earth is a satellite of the sun. We’ll look at the man-made satellites that orbit the Earth and sun, highly specialized tools that do thousands of tasks every day. This can be made into an overhead.
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1998 Project Oceanography Fall Series 3 Unit II Satellite Oceanography Satellite Oceanography Satellite Oceanography Satellites can orbit the Earth several times a day. By placing instruments on a satellite, an oceanographer can obtain data from all over the world in a short amount of time. These instruments are able to measure the temperature of the ocean surface, the height of the water, the speed of the wind above the water and many other things. Satellites can take measurements over
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course OCB 6050 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at University of South Florida.

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f98u2le1 - Satellite Oceanography Lesson I Satellite...

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