om_1 - Ocean in Motion 1: Who cares? Sea Captains,...

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©1998 Project Oceanography Spring Series Ocean in Motion 1 Ocean in Motion 1: Who cares? Sea Captains, Scientists and You! A. Overview-- Who Cares? 1. The Ocean in Motion In this program, students will learn why ocean circulation is studied. The major portion of this lecture will cover the historical aspects of the world before modern ocean circulation studies; exploration, trade, navigation, and communication. We will conclude by introducing the modern reason for studying ocean circulation, namely climate. 2 . Contents of Packet Your packet contains copies of the following activities: I. Where in the world are you? a. Find your longitude line. b. Find your longitude and Greenwich Meridian Time. II. Build your own Astrolabe. III. The Communication Race. B. Program Preparation 1. Focus Points O Exploration and trade led to: a. the study of ocean circulation b. improvements in navigational equipment c. accurate cartography d. improvements in methods of communication e. concept of local time versus Greenwich Meridian Time (GMT). O The modern reason for studying ocean circulation is to enhance our knowledge and ability to predict climate. C. Showtime 1. Broadcast Topics This broadcast will link into discussions on geography and global vegetation, history, communications, basic astronomy, and geometry.
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©1998 Project Oceanography Spring Series Ocean in Motion 2 a. Before Ocean Exploration Approximately 3000 years ago, the Greeks and Egyptians believed the earth was flat. People living in various parts of the world did not know about the existence of other lands or cultures. b. Exploration, Trade, and Navigation By the 1400's, scholars believed the earth was round because of it's shadow on the moon, but this had not been proven. The hope of increased trade of silks and spices from Asia led Europeans to finance large sailing expeditions. The aim was to find new and faster routes to the East. This was the 'Golden Age of Exploration'. During this time, Columbus reached the Americas; Magellan first crossed the Pacific and reached the Philippines. Increases in the number of ships and lives lost at sea led to improvements in navigational equipment and mapping of the major surface currents that ships utilized for travel. Follow-up activity: I. Where in the world are you? II. Build your own Astrolabe. c.
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course OCB 6050 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at University of South Florida - Tampa.

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om_1 - Ocean in Motion 1: Who cares? Sea Captains,...

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