s99u2le2 - Ocean Technology Lesson II Oceanographic...

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Project Oceanography Spring Series 1999- Ocean Technology 11 Ocean Technology Lesson II. Oceanographic Instruments Shadowed Image Particle Profiling Evaluation Recorder, SIPPER The Shadowed Image Particle Profiling System (SIPPER) is an optical imaging system designed to produce high resolution images of very small sea life. SIPPER’s sampling tube has a cross section of 100mm by 100mm, and it has been optimized to yield very good images of very small specimens within the entire sampling tube. Below is a schematic of the SIPPER instrument. A laser with line generator optics creates a fan beam of light, which is brought back together by a first lens. The resulting beam is 100mm wide by 1mm high and passes through a clear opening in the sides of a square sampling tube. The imaging lens produces an unchanged and demagnified image of the particles onto a line scan camera. The digital output from the camera is sent to an image processing board (not shown in the schematic), which acquires the data and displays and saves the sequential lines on a computer. Shown on page 12 is a picture of a light bulb filament taken by the SIPPER.
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Project Oceanography Spring Series 1999- Ocean Technology 12 Ocean Technology Image of a 1.5mm diameter light bulb filament and a 250 micron optical fiber at the center of the sampling tube, moving at 0.25 m/sec through the light sheet. The camera scan rate is 6000 lines/sec. The figure shows a 3.62 mm portion of the 100 mm sample cross section. Real-time Ocean Bottom Topography System, ROBOT Range scanning, illustrated in the figures below, can provide real- time range information along with shape, orientation, texture, and volume of a target. Laser light, generated in a fan pattern as illustrated in the first figure, illuminates the bottom surface as the host platform moves across the sea bed. A high speed (700fps) 256 by 256 pixel camera views the illuminated scene, captures and analyzes data in real time, and transmits it to a display computer. AUVs typically have sophisticated control systems that allow for optimization of mission parameters. Parameters such as uniform mean altitude, constant velocity (either with respect to ground or water) and accurate positioning make AUVs ideal as a platform to carry the Real-time Ocean Bottom Topography (or ROBOT) system.
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Project Oceanography Spring Series 1999- Ocean Technology 13 Ocean Technology The figure above shows range scanning with a low power laser and a high speed CCD camera. Data are stored in line scan form, 256 bytes at a time in the host computer. Initial processing of "brightest pixel" information, using a threshold process, as well as the option of more sophisticated processing (successive approximation) is performed in the camera itself. The figure below shows a scanned
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course OCB 6050 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at University of South Florida.

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s99u2le2 - Ocean Technology Lesson II Oceanographic...

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