Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Audition the Body Senses and the Chemical Senses Audition The stimulus Sounds vary in their Pitch – a perceptual dimension

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 7 Audition, the Body Senses, and the Chemical Senses Audition The stimulus Sounds vary in their: Pitch – a perceptual dimension of sound; corresponds to their fundamental frequency Loudness – corresponds to intensity Timbre – corresponds to complexity Anatomy of the ear Sound is funneled via the pinna (external ear) through the ear canal to the tympanic membrane (eardrum), which vibrates with the sound The middle ear is located behind the tympanic membrane and includes the middle ear bones, the ossicles (malleus, incus and stapes) The malleus connects with the tympanic membrane and transmits vibrations via the incus and stapes to the cochlea , the sructure that contains the receptors Anatomy of the ear The cochlea is part of the inner ear; it is filled with fluid, therefore sounds transferred through the air must be transferred into a liquid medium; the ossicles aid in this transmission The cochlea is divided into 3 sections: the scala vestibuli, scala media, and scala tympani The receptive organ, the organ of Corti , consists of the basilar membrane, the hair cells, and the tectorial membrane The auditory receptor cells are called hair cells , and they are anchored, via Deiter’s cells , to the basilar membrane Sound waves cause the basilar membrane to move relative to the tectorial membrane, which bends the cilia of the hair cells; this bending produces receptor potentials Audition Hair cells Hair cells contain cilia (hair-like appendages involved in movement or in transducing sensory info) The hair cells form synapses with dendrites of bipolar neurons whose axons bring auditory info to the brain The Auditory pathway The organ of Corti sends auditory info to the brain by means of the cochlear nerve , a branch of the vestibulocochlear nerve (8 th cranial nerve) The pathway goes through the midbrain to the auditory cortex located in the temporal lobe Auditory info is represented tonotopically , i.e. topographically organized mapping of different frquencies of sound that are represented in a particular region of the brain Perception of pitch Place coding Detecting moderate to high frequencies The system by which info about different frequencies is coded (i.e. The system by which info about different frequencies is coded (i....
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course PSB 3004 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Audition the Body Senses and the Chemical Senses Audition The stimulus Sounds vary in their Pitch – a perceptual dimension

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