Chapter 11 - Chapter 11 Emotion Emotions as response...

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Chapter 11 Emotion
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Emotions as response patterns Consists of 3 types of components: Behavioral – consists of muscular movements that are appropriate to the situation that elicits them e.g. dog defending its territory, growls and assumes aggressive posture Autonomic – facilitate the behaviors and provide quick mobilization of energy for vigorous movement e.g. heart rate increase Hormonal – reinforce the autonomic responses e.g. hormones secreted by the adrenal medulla (epinephrine and NE) further increase blood flow to muscles
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Fear Research with lab animals The integration of the 3 components of fear appears to be controlled by the amygdala Various nuclei of the amygdala become active when emotionally relevant stimuli are presented Major regions of the amygdala Medial nucleus – receives sensory input, including info about the presence of odors, and relays it to the medial basal forebrain and hypothalamus Lateral nucleus (LA) – receives sensory info from the primary somatosensory cortex, assc. Cortex, thalamus and hippocampal formation; sends projections to basal, accessory basal, and central nucleus of the amygdala Central nucleus (CE) – region of the amygdala that receives sensory info from the basal, lateral, and accessory basal nuclei and projects to a wide variety of regions in the brain; involved in emotional responses; damage to the CE results in a reduction or abolishment of a wide range of emotional behaviors and physiological responses
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Fear Research with lab animals (con’t) CE important for aversive emotional learning Conditioned emotional response – a classically conditioned response that occurs when a neutral stimulus (e.g. bell) is followed by an aversive stimulus (e.g. shock); usually included autonomic, behavioral, and endocrine components such as changes in heart rate, freezing, and secretion of stress-related hormones However, if an organism can learn a coping response (a response that terminates, avoids, or minimizes an aversive stimulus), the emotional responses will not occur CE necessary for development of a conditioned emotional response Research with humans Lesions of the amygdala decrease people’s emotional responses Damage to the amygdala interferes with the effects of emotions on memory
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Anger and aggression Species-typical behaviors Many related to reproduction (e.g. gain access to mate) Threat behaviors – a stereotypical species-typical behavior that warns another animal that it may be attacked if it does not flee or show a submissive behavior; displayed more often than actual attacks Defensive behaviors – a species-typical behavior by which an animal defends itself against the threat of another animal Submissive behaviors – a stereotyped behavior shown by an animal in response to threat behavior by another animal; serves to prevent an attack Predation – attack of one animal directed at an individual of another species on which the attacking animals normally preys
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course PSB 3004 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter 11 - Chapter 11 Emotion Emotions as response...

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