Lecture 15 Porosity and Sinkholes 2

Lecture 15 Porosity and Sinkholes 2 - Features of the...

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Features of the Floridan Aquifer
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Carbonate Deposition For approximately 125 million years the Florida Platform was dominated by carbonate deposition Late Jurassic 150 mya – 24 mya
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Carbonate Deposition/Sedimentation Marine Calcium and Magnesium Carbonate CaCO 3 MgCO 3
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The Eocene and Oligocene limestone forms the principal fresh water-bearing unit of the Floridan Aquifer , one of the most productive aquifer systems in the world Eocene: 55 – 34 million years ago Oligocene: 34 – 24 million years ago The Eocene and Oligocene Limestone Older limestone Eocene/Oligocene Limestone
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Isolation of the Florida Peninsula Suwannee Current (similar to Gulf Stream) Georgia Channel sediments sediments
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1. Raising of the Florida platform 2. Lowering of sea levels, interruption of the Suwannee Current 3. Infilling of the Georgia Channel with sediments derived from Appalachian/continental erosion 4. Sea level rise, lack of Suwannee current. 5. Suspended siliciclastic sediments settle over the peninsula These sediments blanket the underlying limestone forming the upper confining layer for the Floridan Aquifer. Beginning 24 million years ago
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Sands The accumulated limestone forming the Florida Platform is overlain by silicon-based deposits of Miocene age. Older limestone Eocene/Oligocene Limestone (55 – 24 mya) Miocene Clays (Hawthorne) These are typically clayey and called The Hawthorne Formation.
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Megalodon #MG1 Locality: Hawthorne Formation, South Carolina Age:Miocene Virtually flawless museum grade specimen. Perfect serrations, black and gray mottling Price: $785.00 SOLD Miocene sediments are non-carbonate marine sediments
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The thickness of and depth to Miocene sediments varies Up to 40% phosphorus 0-500 ft thick in the North-central part of state Also contains uranium OK Uranium decays to Radon
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55 – 24 million years ago Miocene Clays (low permeability) Surface Siliciclastics (sandy) (highly permeable) The Floridan aquifer is a confined aquifer. The water-bearing unit
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course SOS 2007 taught by Professor Dr.jamesbonczek during the Summer '07 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture 15 Porosity and Sinkholes 2 - Features of the...

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