Lecture 5 Water I - Soil Water Soil Water Water as a...

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Unformatted text preview: Soil Water Soil Water Water as a Resource CIA Global Trends: Natural Resources and Environment (projections for 2015) Overall food production will be adequate to feed the world's growing population, but poor infrastructure and distribution, political instability, and chronic poverty will lead to malnourishment in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. The potential for famine will persist in countries with repressive government policies or internal conflicts. Despite a 50 percent increase in global energy demand, energy resources will be sufficient to meet demand ; the latest estimates suggest that 80 percent of the world's available oil and 95 percent of its gas remain underground. In contrast to food and energy, water scarcities and allocation will pose significant challenges to governments in the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and northern China. Regional tensions over water will be heightened by 2015. India China Pakistan the worlds total agricultural groundwater use In India, 80% of domestic supply and 70% of agricultural supply is from groundwater Fastest growing countries The water table under some of the major grain-producing areas in northern China is falling at a rate of five feet per year, and water tables throughout India are falling an average of 3-10 feet per year. Chinas wheat, 1/3 corn Levels dropping 10 ft. or more / year Shift to Deep fossil aquifer (non-replenishable) Agricultural well depths can exceed 1000 feet ($) Municipal well depths can exceed 3000 ft. Shallow aquifer largely depleted (replenishable) Chinas grain production has fallen from its historical peak of 392 million tons in 1998 to an estimated 358 million tons in 2005, a drop of 34 million tons....
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Lecture 5 Water I - Soil Water Soil Water Water as a...

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