intro - Compilation of notes for Introduction Hazard Risk...

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Compilation of notes for Introduction, Hazard, Risk, and Probability: 1. 2. 3. Hazards include catastrophic disasters, like the 2008 M=7.9 earthquake in Sichuan China on May 12, which killed over 70,000 people. 4. 375,000 people injured, almost 5 million homeless—the 19 th deadliest earthquake of ALL TIME (and it occurred just last year). 5. Hazards include volcanic eruptions, like the January 17, 2008 eruption of Galeras volcano in Columbia. It produced no injuries, but 8,000 people were evacuated. 6. 7. Or the 2008 eruption of Kilauea volcano, which erupted at its summit for the first time in 50 years. 8. Hazards include coastal hazards, such as erosion produced by storms such as Tropical Storm Fay in 2008. 9. . . . or typhoons like Typhoon Nargis on May 5, 2008, which killed approximately 250,000 people in Myanmar 10. Last part of course will be given over to a more insidious, slow-moving hazard: global climate change. This picture shows the Arctic ocean in 2008, which included the unfrozen north pole for the first time in over 20,000 years. 11. This course differs from other geology courses in that it emphasizes the applications of geology to policy. For example, we will learn not only the science behind the hazard of coastal erosion, but how to measure how much risk that poses and how to mitigate (lessen) that risk. 12. Now onto details of class structure . . . 13. Class structured with two lectures and one recitation per week. Students MUST attend recitation or will almost certainly fail class. 14. Book can be purchased as hard copy or as online access, which is much cheaper. 15. Recitation is designed to be a smaller-group setting where students learn by DOING as opposed to LISTENING, and have an opportunity to get to know each other as well as their TA. 16. Lots of help is available if you need it in this class. 17. TA and professor both have office hours you can visit; there’s a discussion forum online where you can ask questions, and there’s email which might get you an immediate answer late at night.
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18. Email etiquette: state GLY2030 on subject line to avoid getting dumped into spam folder; sign your email so I know who you are; don’t make instructor translate text-ese into standard English. 19. Web page is critically important to this class. 20. Web page accessed through USF Blackboard portal. 21. This 3-credit class costs about $450 for instate students and $1,500 per out of state students. What do you get for your money? 22. 23. Two important concepts in this class: hazard and risk. 24. Class is called hazards of the Earth’s surface, but more precisely should be called hazards and risks of the Earth’s surface. 25. Hazard is a source of potential damage. 26. Most natural hazards are random events, meaning you can’t predict precisely when they occur or how strong they will be. Examples are earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, formation of tropical storms.
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