Trade and Investment in North-South relations

Trade and Investment in North-South relations - 18 April:...

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18 April: Trade and investment in North-South relations I. Development strategies Last lecture covered some international development strategies: the establishment of new political organizations and the possibility of growth via foreign aid. These, though, have both had implementation problems. Easterly’s suggestion of pooling aid from various donors runs up against political opposition from donor states and “inefficient” charities, Dollar’s argument that institutional reforms are a necessary prerequisite of effective aid means there’s little donors can do until recipient countries get their acts together, and the move towards organizing developing countries into blocs – so trendy after the 1973 OPEC oil shock – had died by the early 1980s in the wake of the debt crisis and widespread, costly failures to make cartelization work. The early 1980s saw a host of other problems for the South, too. The global recession and surge of conservative governments in the North reduced aid: right-wing parties tended to see handouts as bad, arguing that the developing countries needed to pull themselves up. There was internal political tension, as the success stories of OPEC and East Asia became unlike their former comrades. There were ideological differences, too, between countries like Castro’s Cuba and Pinochet’s Chile.
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Trade and Investment in North-South relations - 18 April:...

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