A Twist of Water 7_22 - 1 A Twist of Water By Caitlin...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 A Twist of Water By Caitlin Montanye Parrish Co-created with Erica L. Weiss CHARACTERS NOAH 39, white, a teacher JIRA 17, black, his daughter LIAM 26, white, a teacher TIA 33, black, JIRA's birth mother 2 Act One Scene 1: Lost [NOAH stands alone. There is the ability to show projections. If it's because of a projector, a computer and TV screen, or an old fashioned slide show, doesn't matter, just that NOAH can supplement the lesson with visuals. At the moment, he is standing before a blank screen, but throughout the course of his talks he'll use it. Director's choice on visuals except when noted. JIRA stands to the side wearing a mans overcoat. NOAH watches her.] NOAH If instead of teaching children to memorize dates and locations I could teach them that history is simply our story I would begin like this. Chicago is Chicago because of its water. In the 1600s French explorers were making their way across the continent and came upon a river, which was called shikaakwa by the Native Americans. The newcomers heard this name and their version became Chicago. They liked the land. The water made it good for transportation. It was the spot where everything they needed to move forward and make progress could come together. You are lucky to have been born here. [JIRA takes off the coat, moving into a classroom. She places the coat on the back of a chair and sits in another chair.] NOAH cont. Try to understand what it was like for someone four hundred years ago to wander through uncharted territory, knowing only that she or he was cold, alone, and afraid. And this person, brave because they had to be, comes across the water of the Chicago river and follows it, for rivers flow into something larger then themselves. At the time the Chicago still emptied into Lake Michigan. That was before we changed the course of the river. Which is possible. Which we did. Our lonely friend follows the river to the lake so large it could be a sea. Maybe it's snowing. It's probably snowing, right? Two in three chance it is. [Snow begins to fall. LIAM enters. JIRA begins working on something] NOAH cont. It's snowing, and our friend reaches a body of water that stretches past the horizon. A could-be ocean. Snow is falling onto the beaches, and something occurs to our friend: I could have a home here. LIAM So, Lost. By Mr. Sandburg. NOAH I heard a young English teacher reading this poem a while ago, in the midst of an appalling year. LIAM Desolate and lone All night long on the lake Where fog trails and mist creeps, 3 The whistle of a boat Calls and cries unendingly, Like some lost child In tears and trouble Hunting the harbor's breast And the harbor's eyes. NOAH Back in the day, there was no boat. No harbor. Nothing but wild water and forest, and potential....
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This note was uploaded on 08/02/2011 for the course TD 301 taught by Professor Dvoskin during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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A Twist of Water 7_22 - 1 A Twist of Water By Caitlin...

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