final exam es 33-35

final exam es 33-35 - ES10 Spring 2011 Review Questions for...

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ES10 Spring 2011 Review Questions for Final Exam Lecture 33 (Apr 18) - Lecture 35 (Apr 22) Lecture 33: April 18 - World Food Supply 1. Give two main reasons why millions of people go hungry despite sufficient world food production? Too few calories, malnutrition lack of nutritional requirements. Limited access. 2. What was the “Green Revolution”? What environmental impacts are associated with the “Green Revolution”? Green Revolution” Post WWII development of new strains of crop plants with high yields, disease resistance, able to tolerate poor conditions. Irrigation Fertilization Pesticides environmental impacts associated with green revolution • Pollution from fertilizers • Pollution from pesticides • Water depletion for irrigations
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• Fossil fuel use for heavy equipment and fertilizer production 3. What is the exploitable yield gap? Yield potential – Actual yield achieved 4. Why does the global demand for grain increase at a rate faster than global population? Use grain for a variety of uses such as feeding cattle. So more grain means more food which can support a growing population 5. What are the limits to crop production? Water availability, nutrients, weeds, pests, others 6. Describe ways of increasing crop yield potential. Changing genetic potential: -- plant breeding, hybridization, manipulation of pollen, human selection -- genetic modification 7. What are the differences between traditional breeding and genetic engineering? They are different: GE can mix genes of very different species. GE is in vitro lab work, not with whole organisms. GE uses novel gene combinations that didn’t come together on their own. 8. What is aquaculture? What are the benefits and environmental impacts of aquaculture? Aquaculture , also known as aquafarming , is the farming of aquatic organisms such as fish , crustaceans , molluscs and aquatic plants . [1][2] Aquaculture involves
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cultivating freshwater and saltwater populations under controlled conditions, and can be contrasted with commercial fishing , which is the harvesting of wild fish . Benefits
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2011 for the course PSYC 132 taught by Professor Phillip during the Spring '11 term at Arkansas.

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final exam es 33-35 - ES10 Spring 2011 Review Questions for...

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