Experiment 1 - CHM171L / A11 Physical Chemistry Laboratory...

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CHM171L / A11 Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2 1 st Quarter S.Y. 2010-2011 Electrochemistry: Determination of Faraday’s Constant Calderon, Edna 1 , Palomaria, Ralph Matthew 2 ,Pineda,Jermaine Marianne 2 , Regulacio, Anna Rafaela 2 1 Professor, CHM171L/A11, School of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biotechnology, Mapua Institute of Technology; 2 Student, CHM171L /A11 , School of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Biotechnology, Mapua Institute of Technology ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Electrochemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical reactions which take place in a solution at the interface of an electron conductor (a metal or a semiconductor) and an ionic conductor (the electrolyte), and which involve electron transfer between the electrode and the electrolyte or species in solution. If a chemical reaction is driven by an external applied voltage, as in electrolysis, or if a voltage is created by a chemical reaction as in a battery, it is an electrochemical reaction. In contrast, chemical reactions where electrons are transferred between molecules are called oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions. In general, electrochemistry deals with situations where oxidation and reduction reactions are separated in space or time, connected by an external electric circuit to understand each process. Quantitative aspects of electrolysis were originally developed by Michael Faraday in 1834. Faraday is also credited to have coined the terms electrolyte , electrolysis, among many others while he studied quantitative analysis of electrochemical reactions. Also he was an advocate of the law of conservation of energy. Faraday concluded after several experiments on electrical current in non-spontaneous process, the mass of the products yielded on the electrodes was proportional to the value of current supplied to the cell, the length of time the current existed, and the molar mass of the substance analyzed. In other words, the amount of a substance deposited on each electrode of an electrolytic
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2011 for the course CHE-CHM-BT CHM171L taught by Professor Calderon during the Spring '11 term at Mapúa Institute of Technology.

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Experiment 1 - CHM171L / A11 Physical Chemistry Laboratory...

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