HPS_1040_Nutrition_SP2011_Student

HPS_1040_Nutrition_SP2011_Student - Nutrition Namrita K....

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Nutrition Namrita K. O’Dea MS, RD
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What is a Nutrient? Component of food that is critical to growth and function Must be obtained from food Body cannot make it Without it, deficiency or disease results Micronutrient vs. Macronutrient
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Nutrients and Energy Energy: measured in calories (cal or kcal) Carbohydrates: 4 kcal/gram Protein: 4 kcal/gram Fat: 9 kcal/gram Vitamins: 0 calories Minerals: 0 calories Water: 0 calories
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Nutrient Dense vs. Energy Dense
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Carbohydrates (CHO) 4 kcal/gram Primary function: ENERGY Brain requires 130 g per day (520 kcal) High intensity exercise requires CHO intake Needs: 45-55% of total calories Sources?
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At-home Practice Carbohydrate Calculation 1) For a 2000 total daily calorie intake with 60% from CHO, how many calories come from CHO? 2) How many grams per day of CHO is this?
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Carbohydrate Calculation: Answer 2000*0.6=1200 calories/4 kcal per g = 300 grams Answer: 1200 calories from CHO, 300 grams CHO
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Simple Carbohydrates (Sugars) Dairy (lactose) and Fruits (fructose) have other nutrients such as B vitamins, Vitamin C, calcium, phosphorus, etc. in addition to sugar Sugary snacks and drinks (“empty” calories) provide little to no other nutrients and may be “energy dense” Check food labels for grams of “Sugars”: glucose, fructose, dextrose, honey, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, molasses, brown sugar
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Complex Carbohydrates Grains and Cereals- rice, pasta, barley, wheat, oats, etc. Legumes- Lentils, peas, beans Vegetables- e.g. sweet potatoes, root vegetables Complex CHO contain fiber, vitamins, minerals, protein* and many are “nutrient dense” Most of your daily CHO should be
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Whole Grain Choose whole grain for best nutrient content Half of your grains should be 100% whole grain
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Carbohydrates: Fiber Dietary Fiber: Present naturally in plant foods (fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains) Functional Fiber: Fiber that is added to foods (e.g. chicory root, inulin)
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Carbohydrates: Fiber Soluble Fiber: Helps to decrease blood cholesterol, helps GI function, and control of blood sugars. Found in legumes, oats, fruits Insoluble Fiber: Helps with constipation, adds bulk to stool, decreases risk of diverticulitis. Found in bran, wheat, whole grains, vegetables 25-35 g/day from a variety of foods
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HPS_1040_Nutrition_SP2011_Student - Nutrition Namrita K....

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