Women - Suffrage Womens Suffrage In America Kathleen Brehm...

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Suffrage 1 Women’s Suffrage In America Kathleen Brehm HIS: 204 Instructor: Fred Heppding 07:05:31
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Suffrage 2 Women’s Suffrage In America In the United States, women’s rights have a long evolving history. Women began campaigning for suffrage in the United States in the mid 1800’s, in marches, rallies, speeches, and appeals to the legislators and congress. Their appeals were dismissed, ridiculed, and often abused for their efforts. In 1920, the passage and ratification of the 19 th amendment to the Constitution, which granted the women the right to vote, brought success to their 75 yearlong campaign to be accorded equal citizen rights. Little did they know the affect they would have on future generations. The struggle to achieve equal citizen’s rights for women is often thought to have begun in the English speaking world during the 19 th century as male suffrage was gradually extended in many countries. Meanwhile, women became increasingly active in the pursuit for their own suffrage and to be able to have the same right to vote as men. “Suffrage” is the right to vote, and modern democracies, including the United States, extend that right to almost all responsible adult citizens which is known as “universal suffrage.” This term may also be used in the reference of the term “equal women’s rights.” It refers to freedoms and entitlements of all women and girls of all ages. In the early nineteenth century, women were considered second-class citizens whose existence was limited to the interior life of the home and care of the children. Women were considered sub-sets of their husbands, and after marriage they did not have the right to own property, have parental rights, maintain their wages, or sign a contract much less vote. It was expected that women be obedient wives, never to hold a thought or be independent of their husbands. It was considered improper for women to travel alone or speak in public.
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Suffrage 3 With the belief that intense physical or intellectual activity would be detrimental to the delicate female biology and reproductive system, women were taught to refrain from pursuing any serious education. Silently perched in their birdcages, women were considered merely objects of beauty and were looked upon as intellectually and physically inferior to men. This belief in women’s inferiority to men was further reinforced by organized religion which preached strict and well-defined sex roles. In the beginning of the fight for women’s suffrage is traced to the Declaration of Sentiments produced at the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York in the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. Four years later, at the Women’s Rights Convention in Syracuse New York, Susan B. Anthony joined the fight. After the civil war campaigning by women for the ballot became increasingly enthusiastic. In 1869 a rift developed among feminists over the proposed 15 th amendment which gave the vote to
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2011 for the course ENG 122 taught by Professor Banks during the Spring '10 term at Ashford University.

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Women - Suffrage Womens Suffrage In America Kathleen Brehm...

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