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jbrooks_research - ComputerCrime1 Jerald Brooks Computer...

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Computer Crime 1 Jerald Brooks Computer Crime Computer Literacy: INF 103 Professor Catherine White 12/05/2008
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Computer Crime 2 Thesis Computer crime has accrued since the first computer was built. So many hackers have become the cowboys of computer information. These individuals know how to create a problem within the information highway. These individuals who are called ‘hackers’ will become the worst enemy or the best friend you could ever have. From the dawn of hacking to today’s crime sprees, what will happen next?
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Computer Crime 3 A lot of people have been victimized by cybercrimes to where they have lost their identity to losing their bank accounts. If we try to prevent this issue we could live in a safer environment to where we wouldn’t have to worry about using our credit cards at a terminal. Cybercrime Statute and treaty law both refer to cybercrime. In Australia, cybercrime has a narrow statutory meaning as used in the Cybercrime Act 2001 (Cwlth), which details offences against computer data and systems. However, a broad meaning is given to cybercrime at an international level. In the Council of Europe's Cybercrime Treaty (EST no. 185), cybercrime is used as an umbrella term to refer to an array of criminal activity including offences against computer data and systems, computer-related offences, content offences, and copyright offences. This wide definition of cybercrime overlaps in part with general offence categories that need not be ICT dependent, such as white-collar crime and economic crime as described in Grabosky P & Sutton A 1989, Stains on a white collar. Sydney: Federation Press. High tech crime High tech crime is a common label used by both the Australian High Tech Crime Centre and by the National High Tech Crime Unit in the United Kingdom. These agencies deal with crimes that rely on the use of ICT, or which target ICT equipment, data and services. Their focus is on the complex networking capacity of ICT, which creates a previously unimaginable platform for committing and investigating criminal activity.
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Computer Crime 4 High tech emphasises the role of ICT in the commission of the offence. Different practical considerations arise according to whether ICT equipment, services or data are the object of the offence, or whether ICT is the tool for the commission of a 'material component of the offence'. Hacking's History From phone phreaks to Web attacks, hacking has been a part of computing for 40 years. Hacking has been around pretty much since the development of the first electronic computers. What are hackers and crackers? Originally, the term "hacker" described any amateur computer programmer who discovered ways to make software run more efficiently. In a broader sense, hacker describes anyone who writes computer programs, modifies computer hardware, or tinkers with computers or electronic devices for fun. Hackers will "hack" on a problem until they find a solution, always trying to make their equipment work in new, more efficient ways. Due to sensationalized depictions in films and other modern media, the popular definition of
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jbrooks_research - ComputerCrime1 Jerald Brooks Computer...

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