34 - Chapter 11: Analyzing the Association Between...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 11: Analyzing the Association Between Categorical Variables Section 11.1: What is Independence and What is Association?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Learning Objectives 1. Comparing Percentages 2. Independence vs. Dependence
Background image of page 2
3 Learning Objective 1: Example: Is There an Association Between Happiness and Family Income?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 The percentages in a particular row of a table are called conditional percentages They form the conditional distribution for happiness, given a particular income level Learning Objective 1: Example: Is There an Association Between Happiness and Family Income?
Background image of page 4
5 Learning Objective 1: Example: Is There an Association Between Happiness and Family Income?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Guidelines when constructing tables with conditional distributions: Make the response variable the column variable Compute conditional proportions for the response variable within each row Include the total sample sizes Learning Objective 1: Example: Is There an Association Between Happiness and Family Income?
Background image of page 6
7 Learning Objective 2: Independence vs. Dependence For two variables to be independent , the population percentage in any category of one variable is the same for all categories of the other variable For two variables to be dependent (or associated), the population percentages in the categories are not all the same
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Learning Objective 2: Independence vs. Dependence Are race and belief in life after death independent or dependent? The conditional distributions in the table are similar but not exactly identical It is tempting to conclude that the variables are dependent
Background image of page 8
9 Learning Objective 2: Independence vs. Dependence Are race and belief in life after death independent or dependent? The definition of independence between variables refers to a population The table is a sample , not a population
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 Even if variables are independent, we would not expect the sample conditional distributions to be identical Because of sampling variability, each sample percentage typically differs somewhat from the true population percentage Learning Objective 2: Independence vs. Dependence
Background image of page 10
11 Chapter 11: Analyzing the Association Between Categorical Variables Section 11.2: How Can We Test Whether Categorical Variables Are Independent?
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
12 Learning Objecti ves 1. A Significance Test for Categorical Variables 2. What Do We Expect for Cell Counts if the Variables Are Independent? 3. How Do We Find the Expected Cell Counts? 4. The Chi-Squared Test Statistic 5. The Chi-Squared Distribution 6. The Five Steps of the Chi-Squared Test of Independence
Background image of page 12
13 Learning Objectiv es 1. Chi-Squared is Also Used as a “Test of Homogeneity” 2. Chi-Squared and the Test Comparing Proportions in 2x2 Tables 3. Limitations of the Chi-Squared Test
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
14 Learning Objective 1: A Significance Test for Categorical Variables Create a table of frequencies divided into the categories of the two variables The hypotheses for the test are: H 0 : The two variables are independent H
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 83

34 - Chapter 11: Analyzing the Association Between...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online