Sarzin_2019_Forced_Displacement_Literatu.pdf - Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized 2019 Compiled by Joint Data Center on Forced

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Unformatted text preview: Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized 2019 Compiled by Joint Data Center on Forced Displacement Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized FORCED DISPLACEMENT LITERATURE REVIEW Note: The JDC Literature Review provides summaries of recently published research to encourage the exchange of ideas on topics related to forced displacement. The findings, interpretations and conclusions expressed in the literature included in this review are entirely those of their authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Joint Data Center, UNHCR, the World Bank, the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent. For convenience, the Literature Review contains links to websites operated by third parties. The Joint Data Center and its affiliate organizations do not represent or endorse these sites or the content, services and products they may offer, and do not guarantee the accuracy or reliability of any information, data, opinions, advice or statements provided on these sites. INTRODUCTION The Literature Review compiled by the Joint Data Center (JDC) on Forced Displacement highlights recent publications, academic scholarship, and thought leadership on issues relating to forced displacement. Our intention is to stimulate discussion, encourage the exchange of ideas, and support a ‘Community of Practice’ on forced displacement. By sharing up-to-date data and analysis, the Literature Review supports JDC’s overall mission: to enhance the ability of stakeholders to make timely and evidence-informed decisions that can improve the lives of affected people. Our Literature Review is not intended to be an exhaustive survey of recent academic scholarship on forced displacement. Rather, JDC selects what it considers to be the most relevant literature based on a broad search of recent publications, including working papers, peer-reviewed academic journals as well as reports produced by international organizations, government agencies, NGOs, and research and policy institutes. Nor is this Literature Review intended to be a critical or integrative review of recent scholarship on forced displacement. Instead, it provides a short summary of the selected publications in a clear, concise and readable format. This document—which we will update regularly—is a compilation of all previous issues of the forced displacement literature review, including prior issues prepared by the World Bank’s Fragility Conflict and Violence Group. It organizes the literature by theme into the following 11 chapters: 1. Countries of Origin, Return, and Restitution, covering drivers of forced displacement, as well as literature relating to the return of displaced people and the restitution of their land and property. 2. Education, including impacts on educational outcomes of host community and displaced children, barriers to improving educational outcomes, and education interventions in displacement contexts. 3. Gender and LGTBI, covering literature related to gender-based violence, marriage and fertility, and LGTBI issues. 4. Geopolitics of Forced Displacement and Foreign Aid, including the impact of aid on asylum seeker and refugee flows, global compacts and trade preferences, and responsibility- and burden-sharing. 5. Health, including mental health impacts and health interventions for displaced populations. 6. Impact on Host Communities and Host Countries, covering impacts on poverty, labor markets and firms, housing markets, education, politics, crime, migration dynamics, conflict and macroeconomic outcomes. 7. Integration, Inclusion, and Social Cohesion of displaced populations, including socio-economic profiles of displaced populations, access to services, labor market outcomes, poverty and 2 wellbeing, as well as policies and programs to promote economic integration. This chapter also includes literature on social cohesion and interactions with host communities. 8. Internal Displacement, drawing together the literature on the causes and drivers of internal displacement, specific vulnerabilities of IDPs, socio-economic impacts on host countries and communities, and the return and reintegration of IDPs. 9. Private Sector, including private sector initiatives to engage displaced populations and host communities as well as assessments of market potential. 10. Technology, covering emerging technologies in displacement contexts. 11. Urban and Local Government, including case studies of displacement in urban contexts. We hope this easily searchable compilation of over 300 summaries will be useful to our subscribers. We welcome your feedback on this initial compilation as well as suggestions for future issues. Please address them to Zara Sarzin at [email protected] If you are not already receiving the monthly issues of the JDC’s Literature Review, you can subscribe to new issues here. Björn Gillsäter Head of the Joint Data Center on Forced Displacement – a partnership between the World Bank and UNHCR 3 Table of Contents I. COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN, RETURN, AND RESTITUTION ............................. 19 Climate Change and Forced Migration..................................................................................... 20 Missirian and Schlenker (2017) Asylum Applications Respond to Temperature Fluctuations .................... 20 Abel et al (2019) Climate, Conflict, and Forced Migration ........................................................................... 20 Decisions to Flee .................................................................................................................... 21 Jaspars and Margie Buchanan-Smith (2018) Darfuri Migration from Sudan to Europe: From Displacement to Despair ..................................................................................................................................................... 21 Kirwin and Anderson (2018) Identifying the Factors Driving West African Migration ................................ 23 Ceriani and Verme (2018) Risk Preferences and the Decision to Flee Conflict ............................................ 25 Bocquého et al (2018) Risk and Refugee Migration..................................................................................... 25 UNODC (2018) Global Study on Smuggling of Migrants 2018 ..................................................................... 26 Schon (2019) Motivation and Opportunity for Conflict-Induced Migration: An Analysis of Syrian Migration Timing .......................................................................................................................................................... 28 Steele (2019) Civilian Resettlement Patterns in Civil War ........................................................................... 29 Aksoy and Poutvaara (2019) Refugees’ Self-selection into Europe: Who Migrates Where? ...................... 30 Balcilar and Nugent (2019) The Migration of Fear: An Analysis of Migration Choices of Syrian Refugees . 32 Saldarriaga and Hua (2019) A Gravity Model Analysis of Forced Displacement in Colombia...................... 32 Communities Left Behind........................................................................................................ 33 Passey (2018) How Migration to Europe Affects Those Left Behind ........................................................... 33 Howe et al (2018) The Wages of War: Learning from How Syrians Have Adapted their Livelihoods through Seven Years of Conflict................................................................................................................................. 34 Salmon, Assaf and Francis (2018) Surviving Firms of the Syrian Arab Republic: A Rapid Assessment ........ 34 Return ................................................................................................................................... 35 Dadush (2018) The Economic Effects of Refugee Return ............................................................................ 35 Keith and Shawaf (2018) When is Return Voluntary? Conditions of Asylum in Lebanon ............................ 36 Vignal (2018) Perspectives on the Return of Syrian Refugees ..................................................................... 36 Samuel Hall (2018) Syria’s Spontaneous Returns ........................................................................................ 37 IMPACT Initiatives (2018) Picking up the Pieces: Realities of Return and Reintegration in North-East Syria ..................................................................................................................................................................... 37 4 Abdel-Rahim et al (2018) Forced Displacement and Behavioral Change: An Empirical Study of Returnee Households in the Nuba Mountains ............................................................................................................ 39 DSP and Impact Initiatives (2019) Far from Home: Future Prospects for Syrian Refugees in Iraq .............. 40 World Bank (2019) The Mobility of Displaced Syrians - An Economic and Social Analysis .......................... 42 Restitution of Land and Property ............................................................................................ 44 Clutterbuck (2018) Property Restitution in Post-Conflict Syria ................................................................... 44 Arraiza and Leckie (2018) A Vision for Restitution in Myanmar .................................................................. 44 Miscellaneous ........................................................................................................................ 45 Siddiqui (2018) Balancing the Rights of Displaced, Returning and Remaining Populations: Learning from Iraq ............................................................................................................................................................... 45 Fabbe et al (2019) A Persuasive Peace: Syrian Refugees’ Attitudes Towards Compromise and Civil War Termination ................................................................................................................................................. 45 II. EDUCATION ........................................................................................ 47 Impacts of Displacement on Educational Outcomes of Displaced People .................................. 48 Sieverding et al (2018) Education Interrupted: Enrollment, Attainment, and Dropout of Syrian Refugees in Jordan .......................................................................................................................................................... 48 Becker et al (2018) Forced Migration and Human Capital: Evidence from Post-WWII Population Transfers ..................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Impacts on Educational Outcomes of Host Communities ......................................................... 49 Tumen (2018) The Impact of Low-skill Refugees on Youth Education (PRELIMINARY) ............................... 49 Assaad et al (2018) Impact of Syrian Refugees in Jordan on Education Outcomes for Jordanian Youth .... 50 Bossavie (2018) The Effect of Immigrant Concentration at School on Natives’ Achievement: Does Length of Stay in the Host Country Matter? ............................................................................................................ 51 Fransen et al (2018) The Impact of Refugee Experiences on Education: Evidence from Burundi ............... 51 Bilgili et al (2019) Is the Education of Local Children Influenced by Living Nearby a Refugee Camp? Evidence from Host Communities in Rwanda .............................................................................................. 52 Bataineh and Montalbano (2018) The Impact of Syrian Crisis on the Quality of Education in Jordan: A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment ................................................................................................... 53 Tumen (2019) Refugees and ‘Native Flight’ from Public to Private Schools ................................................ 53 Tumen (2019) The Effect of Refugees on Native Adolescents’ Test Scores: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from PISA ..................................................................................................................................................... 54 Barriers to Improving Educational Outcomes .......................................................................... 55 OLIve (2019) “Education is Key to Life”: The Importance of Education from the Perspective of Displaced Learners ....................................................................................................................................................... 55 Gladwell (2019) Accessing and Thriving in Education in the UK .................................................................. 55 5 Hauber-Özer (2019) Schooling Gaps for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ............................................................ 56 Psycho-Social Support ............................................................................................................ 57 McEvoy (2019) Feeling Safe Enough to Learn in a Conflict Zone ................................................................. 57 Khaddour (2019) Early Childhood Development and Psychosocial Support in Syria ................................... 57 Singh and Tocchio (2019) Child-friendly Spaces: Enhancing their Role in Improving Learning Outcomes .. 58 Iversen and Oestergaard (2019) Gender Equality in Education in Emergencies ......................................... 58 Disability ................................................................................................................................ 59 Barrett, Marshall and Goldbart (2019) Refugee Children with Communication Disability in Rwanda: Providing the Educational Services They Need ............................................................................................ 59 Adult Literacy ......................................................................................................................... 60 Lanciotti (2019) Adult Literacy: An Essential Component of the CRRF ........................................................ 60 Digital Skills............................................................................................................................ 60 Peromingo and Pieterson (2018) The New World of Work and the Need for Digital Empowerment ......... 60 Displaced Teachers ................................................................................................................. 61 Duale et al (2019) Teachers in Displacement: Learning from Dadaab ......................................................... 61 Connected Learning ................................................................................................................ 61 El-Ghali and Ghosn (2019) Connected Learning: The Future for Higher Education? ................................... 61 Dushime et al (2019) Connected Learning: A Refugee Assessment ........................................................... 62 Education Assessment Tools ................................................................................................... 62 Bali (2019) Improving Learning Environments in Emergencies through Community Participation ............ 62 D’Sa et al (2019) Feasible Measurement of Learning in Emergencies: Lessons from Uganda .................... 63 Krupar and Anselme (2019) Applying Learning Theory to Shape ‘Good Learning’ in Emergencies: Experience from Dadaab, Kenya .................................................................................................................. 63 Private Sector Engagement ..................................................................................................... 64 Zakharia and Menashy (2018) Private Sector Engagement in Refugee Education ...................................... 64 Informal Education ................................................................................................................. 64 Hagan (2019) Street Schools and School Buses: Informal Education Provision in France ........................... 64 Education Policy ..................................................................................................................... 64 UNESCO (2018) 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report: Migration, Displacement and Education: Building Bridges Not Walls ........................................................................................................................... 64 Viscontia and Galb (2018) Regional Collaboration to Strengthen Education for Nationals & Syrian Refugees in Arabic Speaking Host Countries ............................................................................................... 67 Chinnery (2019) Jordan: Education Policy in Transition .............................................................................. 68 Simopoulos and Alexandridis (2019) Refugee Education in Greece: Integration or Segregation? .............. 68 Baron (2019) UK Immigration Policy: Restrictions on Asylum Seekers’ Right to Study ............................... 69 6 Purkey and Irving (2019) The Importance of Access and Accreditation: Learning from the Thailand– Myanmar Border .......................................................................................................................................... 69 Erden (2019) Child Labour and School Attendance in Turkey ..................................................................... 70 Education Interventions in Displacement Contexts .................................................................. 70 Abdul-Hamid et al (2016) Learning in the Face of Adversity: The UNRWA Education Program for Palestine Refugees ...................................................................................................................................................... 70 Save the Children (2017) Restoring Hope, Rebuilding Futures: A Plan of Action for Delivering Universal Education for South Sudanese Refugees in Uganda .................................................................................... 71 Save the Children (2017) Promising Practices in Refugee Education .......................................................... 72 Lacey and Viola (2019) Strengthening Education Systems for Long-Term Education Responses ............... 72 Shammout and Vandecasteele (2019) Inter-sectoral Cooperation for Afghan Refugee Education in Iran . 73 Belghazi (2019) Learning in Resettlement ................................................................................................... 74 Miscellaneous ........................................................................................................................ 75 Bray-Watkins (2019) Breaking the Silence: Sexual Coercion and Abuse in Post-Conflict Education ........... 75 Alalami (2019) Evidence for Education in Emergencies: Who Decides and Why it Matters ....................... 75 Kelcey (2019) Navigating Curricula Choices for Palestine Refugees ............................................................ 75 Diebold et al (2019) Educating Unaccompanied Children in US Shelters .................................................... 76 III. GENDER AND LGBTI ............................................................................ 77 Gender-Based Violence .......................................................................................................... 78 Chynoweth (2018) Caring for Male and LGBTI Sexual Violence Survivors: Learning from Local Organisations ............................................................................................................................................... 78 ...
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