PHY1004W Buffler M&IE&M1

PHY1004W Buffler M&IE&M1 - PHY1004W 2010 Electricity and...

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Prof Andy Buffler Room 503 RW James [email protected] PHY1004W 2010 Electricity and Magnetism Part 1
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60 lectures: 3 rd period, Monday to Friday 12 weekly problem sets 12 Tuesday afternoon tutorials and laboratories 2 class tests 1 final examination (November) Class tutors: Maciej Stankiewicz and Michael Malahe Use them! Also check the course website regularly for resources PHY1004W Second Semester 2008 These lecture notes are not a substitute for … check for significant errata … files on website
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My expectations of you … 1. … that if you come to lectures, then you will engage with what is happening 2. … that you read M&I daily (before and after lectures) 3. … that you do what I ask you to do 4. … that you will not copy another student’s work, but work together, where appropriate. (Collaboration becomes copying when both parties are not gaining positive learning from the activity.) 5. … spend enough time at home working on what you need to … … what you can expect from me … 1. … the best course that I can deliver 2. … a reasonable and appropriate homework load. 3. … no mercy in the face of plagiarism 4. … an open door policy
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Real world (phenomena) Physical model (shared, contextual) idealization Physical theories (shared, acontextual) particularization When making sense of the ideas in this course, it’s useful to think about both the nature of physics and how you learn physics yourself . ..
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Draw one or more pictures which show all the important objects, their motion and any interactions. Now ask What is being asked ?” “Do I need to calculate something?” Think about what physics concepts and principles you think will be useful in solving the problem and when they will be most useful. Construct a mental image of the problem situation - do your friends have the same image? Specify a convenient system to use - circle this on your picture. Identify any idealisations and constraints present in the situation - write them down! Specify any approximations or simplifications which you think will make the problem solution easier, but will not affect the result significantly. An approach to solving physics problems Step 1. Think carefully about the problem situation and draw a picture of what is going on (Pictorial Representation) .
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Draw a coordinate axis (or axes) onto your picture (decide where to put the origin and on the direction of the axes). Translate your pictures into one or more diagrams (with axes) which only gives the essential information for a mathematical solution. If you are using kinematic concepts, draw a motion diagram specifying the object’s velocity and acceleration at definite positions and times. If interactions or statics are important, draw idealised, free body and force diagrams.
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This note was uploaded on 08/02/2011 for the course PHYS 1004W taught by Professor Andy during the Spring '11 term at University of Cape Town.

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PHY1004W Buffler M&IE&M1 - PHY1004W 2010 Electricity and...

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