AP EURO Chapter 22

AP EURO Chapter 22 - CHAPTER 22 THE REVOLUTION IN Energy...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 22 THE REVOLUTION IN Energy and industry I. The Industrial Revolution in Great Britain A. Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales) was the pioneer in industrialization--which  was largely unplanned and with no precedent. B. The eighteenthcentury origins of the Industrial Revolution     1. A colonial empire, the expanding Atlantic trade, and a strong and tarifffree home  market created new demands for English manufactured goods. 2. Cheap food also increased this demand because people could now spend more  on clothing, toys, and so on. 3. Available capital, stable government, economic freedom, and mobile labor in  England encouraged growth. 4. The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain in the 1780s and on the  Continent after 1815. C. The first factories      1. Growing demand for textiles led to the creation of the world's first large factories. a. The puttingout system could not keep up with demand. b. Hargreaves's spinning jenny and Arkwright's water frame speeded up the  spinning process. c. Cotton spinning was gradually concentrated in factories. 2. Cotton goods became cheaper and more widely available. 3. The wages of weavers rose rapidly, and many agricultural workers became  handloom weavers. 4. Working conditions in the early factories were worse than those for people  spinning and weaving at home; factories were viewed as poorhouses. 5. Abandoned children became a prime source of labor in the early factories. a. These "apprenticed" workers commonly worked 13-14 hours per day. b. This exploitation led to reform and humanitarian attitudes toward children. 6. By 1831, the cotton textile industry had grown to 22 percent of the country's entire  industrial production. D. The problem of energy    
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. The search for a solution to the energy problem was a major cause of  industrialization. 2. From prehistoric to medieval times the major energy sources were plants and  animals, and human beings and animals did most of the work. 3. Energy from the land was limited. a. By the eighteenth century, Britain's major source of fuel, wood, was nearly  gone. b. Wood was crucial as a source of heat and as a source of charcoal for the  production of iron. c. A new source of power and energy was needed, so people turned to coal. E. The steam engine breakthrough     1. Before about 1700, coal was used for heat but not to produce mechanical energy  or to run machinery. a.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/04/2011 for the course HIST 1 taught by Professor Johhfear during the Spring '11 term at Arkansas Pine Bluff.

Page1 / 7

AP EURO Chapter 22 - CHAPTER 22 THE REVOLUTION IN Energy...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online