Module 8 CLC Team Blue Paper

Module 8 CLC Team Blue Paper - Trade Report CLC Trade...

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Trade Report CLC Trade Report Angel Llaugel Jason Boughton Vickie Minor Candace Conner Andrew James Grand Canyon University ECN 601 July 13, 2011 1
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Trade Report Throughout the 20th century Brazil had proved its ability to become a leading exporter and importer in today’s global market through agreements with the international trading market. For many years Brazil struggled financially, which caused a major setback for the Brazilian economy. Not having the ability to trade freely in the global market gave the Brazilian government a chance to fight for their right (2). In 2009, Brazil and Argentina, came together to begin creating a trade agreement that we know today as the MERCOSUR (the “common market of the south”), a provincial trade agreement between Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. It wasn’t until 1995, that MERCOSUR was finally complete and became one of the most secured trade agreements in South America. As of the late 1990’s, Brazil began moving MERCOSUR to the east, developing a free trade agreement with the European Union. In 1999 the Brazilian government signed a free trade agreement with the European Union. South American countries are still making their way into the MERCOSUR agreement, as late as last year (2007). During the presidency (USA) of William Clinton, MERCOSUR introduced the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) to Brazil. As of 2005, Brazil’s top trading partners are as follows China , United States , Argentina , Japan and the Netherlands. For Brazil in 2010 it was noted that their total value of exports was $199.7 billion($US), this is an impressive figure for a developing nation, this revenue came primarily through commodities such as transport equipment, iron ore, soybeans, footwear, coffee, and automotive. Each county contributed to Brazil’s export figure China (12.49 percent of total exports), US (10.5 percent), Argentina (8.4 percent), Netherlands (5.39 percent), Germany (4.05 percent) (Economy, 2011). Now in the arena of importing they again did well and it was reported that their total value of imports was
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Module 8 CLC Team Blue Paper - Trade Report CLC Trade...

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