plugin-Chapter 13a Students

plugin-Chapter 13a Students - Normal Distributions CHAPTER...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 13A Normal Distributions
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
SO FAR… We always want to plot our data. We make a graph, usually a histogram or a stemplot. We want to look for an overall pattern (shape, center, spread) and for any striking deviations from that pattern. We choose either the five-number summary or the mean/standard deviation to describe the center and spread of a distribution numerically. Sometimes, the overall pattern of a large number of observations is so regular that we can describe it by a smooth curve.
Background image of page 2
DENSITY CURVES If we draw a curve through the tops of the bars in a histogram, we get what is called a density curve. Unlike histograms, density curves don't show counts but proportions. The total percentage under the curve is always 100%.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
DENSITY CURVES As with histograms or stemplots, we can use the median M, the quartiles Q 1 , Q 3 and the mean to describe a density curve. We describe the shape of density curves with
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/05/2011 for the course STA 200 taught by Professor Wierdhobbitguy during the Summer '08 term at Kentucky.

Page1 / 14

plugin-Chapter 13a Students - Normal Distributions CHAPTER...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online