ppde - THE DEMENTIA NETWORK OF OTTAWA POSITION PAPER ON...

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Unformatted text preview: THE DEMENTIA NETWORK OF OTTAWA POSITION PAPER ON DEMENTIA EDUCATION February 2004 1 CONTENTS PURPOSE. 2 BACKGROUND: STATISTICS AND RELEVANCE. 3 BACKGROUND TO THE FORMATION OF THE EDUCATION TASK FORCE 4 PROPOSED DEMENTIA EDUCATION FRAMEWORK. 6 CONCLUSION. 9 REFERENCES. 9 APPENDICES.. 10 APPENDIX 1: GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR DEMENTIA EDUCATION. 11 APPENDIX 2: DEMENTIA EDUCATION IN BASIC PROGRAMS 14 APPENDIX 3: EDUCATION TASK FORCE MEMBERSHIP.. 18 2 PURPOSE Dementia is a syndrome consisting of a number of symptoms that include loss of memory, judgement and reasoning, and changes in mood and behaviour. These symptoms may affect a persons ability to function at work, in social relationships, or in day-to-day activities. Alzheimer Disease, the most common form of dementia, is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain. It affects the persons ability to understand, think, and remember. The ability to make decisions will be reduced. Simple tasks that have been performed for years will become more difficult or will be forgotten. As the disease progresses, there will be a gradual physical decline. These changes will impact on the persons ability to perform independently day-to-day tasks, such as eating, bathing and getting dressed. Eventually, the person will require 24 hour care until death comes, usually from pneumonia or other infections. Progressive deficits in memory, language, attention, insight, abstraction, judgement, perception, visual-spatial relationships, and motor organization require all persons who work in the dementia care field to possess specific knowledge and skill sets. In basic level health, social service, and allied health educational programs, both at the Community College and University levels, the amount of education specific to dementia is sparse, and in most cases, non-existent. However, students in these programs, upon graduation, often find themselves working with persons who have dementia. Further, it is noted through anecdotal evidence and limited research that current employees providing care to this vulnerable population may also not have had the benefit of specialized education. Within the past five years there has been development of post-graduate educational programs and courses to bridge the gap to meet this need. At the present time, there is no framework developed that provides a coordinated menu of learning which is competency-based and measured against performance evaluations. Assessment of learning and the transference of learning to practice are essential and can best be evaluated when learning outcomes have been...
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ppde - THE DEMENTIA NETWORK OF OTTAWA POSITION PAPER ON...

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