HCA250 WEEK 7 Treatment Options for Clinical Pain

HCA250 WEEK 7 - Treatment Options for Clinical Pain Treatment Options for Clinical Pain XXXX Axia College of University of Phoenix HCA 250

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Treatment Options for Clinical Pain 1 Treatment Options for Clinical Pain XXXX Axia College of University of Phoenix HCA 250 Instructor: Surfield Reaves February 07, 2009
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Treatment Options for Clinical Pain 2 Clinical pain, is pain that may be either acute, chronic, or occur from unknown causes which causes the sufferer to either receive or, require professional treatment (Managing and Controlling Clinical Pain, Week Seven reading, aXcess, HCA250- The Psychology of Health course web site, 2007). Treatment options for clinical pain vary depending on the cause of one’s pain and the type of pain experienced by the individual. Four possible treatment approaches for the individual suffering from clinical pain should be assessed, with these approaches including surgical treatment to eliminate or reduce pain, chemical treatments such as medications, and behavioral or cognitive therapies. According to Managing and Controlling Clinical Pain (2007), “Relieving pain is important for humanitarian reasons, of course—and doing so also produces medical and psychosocial benefits for the patient” (pg.320, ¶4). Therefore, in this paper different types of clinical pains and treatment options will be explained in reference to three different cases. Case 1 In case one the patient considered is most likely suffering from a chronic aspect of pain that stems from phantom pain resulting from a below the knee amputation caused by diabetic neuropathy. Phantom limb pain is known to affect nearly 95% of amputees and in most individual’s phantom pain can be felt as a burning, itching, numbness, or pain in the area of the limb that is no longer present (Cable News Network, 2009). Although the phantom limb pain that is often associated with an amputation is most likely the cause of the patient’s pain. To assess the patient, properly one must also assess the patient for any other underlying causes of pain; it is possible that the patient is suffering pain due to an improperly fitting prosthetic limb that is causing additional stress or irritation to the site or, simply from a lack of physical exercise. Surgical measures most likely will not be needed for treatment of this
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Treatment Options for Clinical Pain 3 individual however, temporary chemical treatments combined with behavioral and cognitive treatments may be needed to eliminate or, control the pain felt by the individual. Case 2 In case, two the patient is suffering from acute pain associated with an abdominal hysterectomy. An abdominal hysterectomy is a surgical procedure performed on a woman to remove the uterus and in some cases fallopian tubes and ovaries through an incision in the lower abdomen. Since the patient is suffering from acute post operative, pain due to major surgery, temporary chemical treatments such as painkillers will be needed to relieve the pain and discomfort felt by the patient. Since pain, medications are only temporary for the patient until pain resides. Minor behavioral and cognitive treatment approaches while hospitalized
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This note was uploaded on 08/05/2011 for the course HCA 250 taught by Professor Robbiejohnson during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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HCA250 WEEK 7 - Treatment Options for Clinical Pain Treatment Options for Clinical Pain XXXX Axia College of University of Phoenix HCA 250

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