Science final, mitigation project

Science final, mitigation project - MITIGATION STRATEGIES...

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MITIGATION STRATEGIES AND SOLUTIONS 1 Mitigation Strategies and Solutions Jaclyn Russo SCI/275 19:00:13 Melissa Filiaggi
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MITIGATION STRATEGIES AND SOLUTIONS 2 Introduction According to the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), as of July 2008 the world’s population consisted of 6,706,993,152 people. In the year 2000, the world’s population consumed 12.32 trillion kWh (kilowatt-hours) of electricity, so far in 2008, it has been estimated that the world’s population has consumed 16.56 trillion kWh of electricity (exxun). It has been estimated, that in 2003 the world consumed 76.21 million barrels of oil per day (bbd/day), while in 2008 the world oil consumption was up to 80.29 million bbd/day (exxun). In 2004, the world’s natural gas consumption rate was estimated at 2.555 trillion cu m (cubic meters) annually. In 2008, the estimated natural gas usage worldwide is an astounding 3.025 trillion cu m (mundi). As the world’s population continues to increase, so does the need to consume more natural resources in order to accommodate to our needs. We are consuming natural resources at such an alarming rate, if something is not done to help sustain these resources, we will eventually deplete every nonrenewable resource available on this planet. Nonliving and Living Factors In regards to oil production and/or transportation, there are numerous living factors that are affected by natural resource consumption. If there is an oil spill when transporting the resource by ship, marine animals, birds that feed by diving or form flocks on the sea, marine life on shorelines, and animals and plants in mariculture facilities are all affected. Extracting oil from the sea can sometimes be environmentally damaging to its inhabitants. Extraction may involve dredging, which stirs up the seabed, killing the sea plants that marine creatures need to survive. Natural gas is often described as the cleanest fossil fuel, producing less carbon dioxide than either coal or oil. However, it does contribute substantially to global emissions, which intern affects the ozone layer, and this contribution is projected to grow. Coal mining can be catastrophic in regards to it affect on the environment. Coal fired power plants provide 49% of the consumed electricity in the United States (OECD). The burning of coal
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MITIGATION STRATEGIES AND SOLUTIONS 3 contributes the most to acid rain, global warming, and air pollution due to the composition of coal, and the difficulties of removing impurities before it is burned. Negative Human Impacts There are many negative human impacts to the environment regarding the consumption of natural resources due to over population. The nonrenewable resource of coal is a major contributor to the production of electricity. The only way to obtain coal is to mine for it. Surface mining of coal, for instance, completely eliminates existing vegetation, destroys the genetic soil profile, displaces or destroys wildlife and habitat, degrades air quality, alters current land uses, and to some extent
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Science final, mitigation project - MITIGATION STRATEGIES...

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