Ch 3 - Introductory Chemistry, 3rd Edition Nivaldo Tro...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Roy Kennedy Massachusetts Bay Community College Wellesley Hills, MA Introductory Chemistry , 3 rd Edition Nivaldo Tro Chapter 3 Matter and Energy 2009, Prentice Hall
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 2 In Your Room Everything you can see, touch, smell or taste in your room is made of matter . Chemists study the differences in matter and how that relates to the structure of matter.
Background image of page 2
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 3 What Is Matter? Matter is defined as anything that occupies space and has mass. Even though it appears to be smooth and continuous, matter is actually composed of a lot of tiny little pieces we call atoms and molecules .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 4 Atoms and Molecules Atoms are the tiny particles that make up all matter. In most substances, the atoms are joined together in units called molecules . The atoms are joined in specific geometric arrangements.
Background image of page 4
5 Structure Determines Properties The properties of matter are determined by the atoms and molecules that compose it. 1. Composed of one carbon atom and two oxygen atoms. 2. Colorless, odorless gas. 3. Incombustible. 4. Does not bind to hemoglobin. Carbon Dioxide 1. Composed of one carbon atom and one oxygen atom. 2. Colorless, odorless gas. 3. Burns with a blue flame. 4. Binds to hemoglobin. Carbon Monoxide
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 6 Classifying Matter by Physical State Matter can be classified as solid, liquid, or gas based on what properties it exhibits. State Shape Volume Compress Flow Solid Fixed Fixed No No Liquid Indefinite Fixed No Yes Gas Indefinite Indefinite Yes Yes Fixed = Property doesn’t change when placed in a container. Indefinite = Takes the property of the container.
Background image of page 6
7 Structure Determines Properties The atoms or molecules have different structures in solids, liquids, and gases − leading to different properties.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 8 Solids The particles in a solid are packed close together and are fixed in position. Although they may vibrate. The close packing of the particles results in solids being incompressible. The inability of the particles to move around results in solids retaining their shape and volume when placed in a new container and prevents the particles from flowing.
Background image of page 8
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 9 Solids, Continued Some solids have their particles arranged in an orderly geometric pattern—we call these crystalline solids. Salt and diamonds. Other solids have particles that do not show a regular geometric pattern over a long range—we call these amorphous solids. Plastic and glass.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tro's "Introductory Chemistry", Chapter 3 10 Liquids The particles in a liquid are closely packed, but they have some ability to move around. The close packing results in liquids being
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 95

Ch 3 - Introductory Chemistry, 3rd Edition Nivaldo Tro...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online