chapter 6 notes

chapter 6 notes - Chapter 5 Recordings Whats Ahead? Edisons...

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Chapter 5 Recordings What’s Ahead? • Edison’s Introduces His Amazing Talking Machine • Peter Goldmark Perfects Long-Playing Records • William S. Paley Battles Sarnoff for Record Format • Hi-Fi and Stereo Rock In • Recording Industry at Work • Concerts Bring in Important Revenue • Four Major Companies Dominate • Music Sales and Licensing Drive Industry Income • Industry Struggles To Protect Content • Recording Industry Association Sues Downloaders • U. S. Supreme Court Rules Against File-Sharing • Changing Technology Transforms Delivery Chapter Outline I. Introduction A. ½ music people buy each year = popular 1. other ½ : country, gospel, rap, classical, show tunes, jazz, and children’s recordings. B. Like broadcast recording industry challenged by rapidly changing technology. C. The recording industry is at the center of debates over protection of artist copyrights. II. Edison’s Introduces His Amazing Talking Machine A. 1877: Thomas Edison phonograph—which means “sound writer.” http://youtube.com/watch?v=Noqcu3O 7ojg B. 1887, Emile Berliner gramophone 1. replaced the cylinder with flat discs. 2. Berliner and Eldrige Johnson founded the Victor Talking Machine Company (RCA Victor) and sold recordings of opera star Enrico Caruso. C. 1927: 1 st jukeboxes: brought recorded music into restaurants and nightclubs. D. By the end of World War II, 78 rpm records (three minutes to a side) were standard.
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III. Peter Goldmark Perfects Long-Playing Records A. late 1940s: Peter Goldmark of CBS’s Columbia Records long-playing (LP) record (23 minutes on each side) 33 1/3 speed. IV. William S. Paley Battles Sarnoff for Record Format A. William S. Paley of CBS offered David Sarnoff of RCA a joint venture to produce LPs. B. Sarnoff refused 45 rpm record, which required a different record player 1. became the standard for jukeboxes 2. singles released this way for 40 years, b-sides B. Eventually, RCA/CBS came together on issue C. Record players played all 3 (describe each use) D. Most of the available recorded music was big band music, Broadway show tunes, and
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chapter 6 notes - Chapter 5 Recordings Whats Ahead? Edisons...

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