Workplace Ethics - Wk1

Workplace Ethics - Wk1 - In analyzing unethical behavior in...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In analyzing unethical behavior in the workplace, we tend towards the aggressive personal interactions that seem to plague both the media and the courtrooms. Lying, thefts, cheating a client or even the ubiquitous inter-office relationship are prime examples of unethical behavior that not only threaten morale but also may financially harm a company’s interests. Jones (1991) defined unethical as behavior that harms and is either illegal or morally unacceptable to the larger community, which is to say that it violated the social norm. While not readily apparent perhaps, these factors are detrimental to employees’ productivity and may cause certain workers to desire relocation. Hiring and firing are substantial investments on their own. But what of motivational techniques? The simple fact is: a policy, in and of itself, is neither immoral nor unethical. The effects of employing a particular policy, as Machiavelli may attest, make the policy seem unethical. In the case of the Metal Crafters, a productivity bonus is difficult to label unethical, as it is
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/06/2011 for the course ACCT 300 taught by Professor Snow during the Spring '11 term at American Public University.

Page1 / 2

Workplace Ethics - Wk1 - In analyzing unethical behavior in...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online