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Chem 30CL- Lecture 1d

Chem 30CL- Lecture 1d - Lecture 1d Click to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/6/11 Resolution Lecture 1d
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8/6/11 Enantiomers usually have identical properties for most parts Separation by simple techniques like recrystallization or distillation is usually not possible Separation of enantiomers Mechanical separation Biochemical processes Formation of diastereomers by reaction with enantiomer of resolving reagent Chiral columns in HPLC or GC (discussed later) Introduction
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8/6/11 Historically the first method was used by Louis Pasteur who recognized that ammonium sodium tartrate formed two different crystalline forms that are mirror images of each other He was able to separate them with tweezers under a microscope. Not very useful for larger quantities Only works for well shaped crystals which requires very well controlled conditions during the crystallization step Mechanical separation
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8/6/11 This process involves enzymes Example 1: reduction of ethylacetoacetate with Baker’s yeast
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