102L6traffic - Chapter 6 Traffic Engineering Traffic...

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October, 1997 RF Engineering 102 v1.0 (c)1997 Scott Baxter 6 - 1 Traffic Engineering Traffic Engineering Typical Traffic Distribution on a Cellular System 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Hour SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT # Trunks Efficiency % Capacity, Erlangs 15 0 80% 41
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October, 1997 RF Engineering 102 v1.0 (c)1997 Scott Baxter 6 - 2 A Game of Avoiding Extremes The traffic engineer must walk a fine line between two problems: n Overdimensioning too much cost insufficient resources to construct traffic revenue is too low to support costs very poor economic efficiency! n Underdimensioning blocking poor technical performance ( interference ) capacity for billable revenue is low revenue is low due to poor quality users unhappy, cancel service very poor economic efficiency!
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October, 1997 RF Engineering 102 v1.0 (c)1997 Scott Baxter 6 - 3 Dimensioning the System: An Interactive, Iterative Process n Some traffic engineering decisions trigger resource acquisition additional blocks of numbers from the local exchange carrier additional cards for various functions in the switch and peripherals additional members in PSTN trunk groups; additional T-1/E-1s to busy sites n Some traffic engineering decisions trigger more engineering finding more frequencies to add to blocking sites adding additional cells to relieve blocking finding short-term fixes for unanticipated problems n This course is concerned primarily with determining the number of voice channels required in cells , with the related site engineering and frequency or code planning DMS-MTX Cell PSTN Office
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October, 1997 RF Engineering 102 v1.0 (c)1997 Scott Baxter 6 - 4 Basics of Traffic Engineering Terminology & Concept of a Trunk n Traffic engineering in telephony is focused on the voice paths which users occupy . They are called by many different names: trunks circuits radios, transceivers (“TRXs”), channel elements (CDMA) n Some other common terms are: trunk group – a trunk group is several trunks going to the same destination, combined and addressed in switch translations as a unit , for traffic routing purposes member – one of the trunks in a trunk group
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October, 1997 RF Engineering 102 v1.0 (c)1997 Scott Baxter 6 - 5 Units of Traffic Measurement General understanding of telephone traffic engineering began around 1910. An engineer in the Danish telephone system, Anger K. Erlang, was one of the first to master the science of trunk dimensioning and publish the knowledge for others. In his honor, the basic unit of traffic is named the Erlang . n An Erlang of traffic is one circuit continuously used during an observation period one hour long. Other units have become popular among various users: n CCS (Hundred-Call-Seconds) n MOU (Minutes Of Use) n It’s easy to convert between traffic units if the need arises: 1 Erlang = 60 MOU = 36 CCS Traffic is expressed in units of Circuit Time
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December, 1997 CDMA BSM, BSC, BTS 6 - 6 How Much Traffic Can One Trunk Carry?
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This note was uploaded on 08/08/2011 for the course CS 310 taught by Professor Aartisingh during the Spring '11 term at National Institute of Technology, Calicut.

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102L6traffic - Chapter 6 Traffic Engineering Traffic...

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