inferential statistics

inferential statistics - Quantitative Methods Introduction...

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  © John M. Ackroff 2008 Quantitative Methods Introduction to Inferential Statistics February 12, 2008
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  © John M. Ackroff 2008 Inference  When we have all the data from a  population available to us, we describe   the population by calculating  parameters  like measures of central  tendency (μ) and variability ( σ 2 ). We can calculate the likelihood of various  events occurring. We can compute percentile ranks.
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  © John M. Ackroff 2008 Inference  When we must use a sample drawn  from the population of interest, we make  inferences  about measures of central  tendency (X) and variability (s 2 ). We estimate characteristics of the  population from the sample. We make inferences about the  relationships between variables.
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  © John M. Ackroff 2008 Inference  Estimates – we make point estimates. As opposed to ranges (like a confidence interval).
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2008 for the course PSYCH 200 taught by Professor Ackroff during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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inferential statistics - Quantitative Methods Introduction...

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