ap08_human_geo_sgs

ap08_human_geo_sgs - AP® Human Geography 2008 Scoring...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® Human Geography 2008 Scoring Guidelines The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,400 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, AP Central, Advanced Placement Program, AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the online home for AP teachers: apcentral.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 1 Von Thünen’s model of land use and Burgess’ model of land use are similar in appearance but different in their geographic setting. Analyze and discuss the two models in terms of each of the following: Part A (1 point) For each of these models, identify the type of land use the model addresses. Acceptable answers (both are required) • Von Thünen: agricultural, farming, or rural • Burgess: urban, city, or a minimum of two descriptors Note: Students may receive credit for this answer if reference is made elsewhere in part B or part C to Burgess, along with words descriptive of urban land use (e.g., “residential” or “housing” and “manufacturing” or “warehousing”). But, students cannot use the same point twice. Part B (2 points) Identify two assumptions that are shared by both models. Any two of the following • Isotropic flat plain or uniform surface; featureless • Importance of centrality (e.g., accessibility to market; CBD) • Individuals maximize profit/minimize costs/maximize use—“highest and best use” • Transportation costs are proportional to distance in all directions • Single market or CBD (e.g., isolated state) Part C (4 points: 1 point for the identification of each of the models’ effects, and 1 point for each of the two explanations) For each of these models, explain how relative location affects land-use patterns. VON THÜNEN Effect Intensive land-use near market Wood and perishable/fragile products near market Explanation High profit(s) needed to pay rent High (frequent) transportation to nearby market Low land rent or low transportation costs Extensive agriculture (grain crops/grazing) at the periphery BURGESS Effect Intensive land use near CBD Intensity/density of residential land use decreases with distance away from CBD High socioeconomic class at edge of city Explanation High costs of land/accessibility Households and other land uses locate away from the CBD, as they can afford transportation Households in this range can afford larger homes and acreage, as well as transportation © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 Regional migration patterns within the contiguous United States are the result of several factors. The map above shows net migration at the county level, but these data support generalizations about migration patterns at the regional scale. Part A (1 point: Two correct responses are required.) Identify two specific regions that have experienced net in-migration. Acceptable • Any specific region that is correctly identified based on the map: for example, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Northeast, Southeast, Sun Belt, Megalopolis, Mountain West, East Coast, Ozarks, Appalachia, Upper Great Lakes • The following individual state names are acceptable: Arizona Maryland California New Hampshire Delaware Tennessee Florida Vermont Maine Virginia • Other states may be named if accompanied by an appropriate descriptor: for example, western Oregon • South, North, East, West, West Coast, Great Lakes, Coastal Plain, urban, or rural (not specific enough) Unacceptable © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 (continued) Part B (1 point: Two correct responses are required.) Identify two specific regions that have experienced net out-migration. Acceptable • Any specific region that is correctly identified based on the map: for example, Great Plains, Midwest, the Rust Belt, metropolitan areas such as New York and Los Angeles, Mississippi Delta, Deep/Old South, Great Lakes, Corn Belt, Texas Panhandle, Lower Mississippi • The following individual state names are acceptable: Alabama Ohio Montana South Dakota Iowa Nebraska Utah Kansas New Mexico Louisiana Part C Mississippi Indiana Unacceptable • North Dakota Illinois • Massachusetts New York Other states may be named if accompanied by an appropriate descriptor: for example, northern Maine South, North, East, West, urban, or rural (not specific enough) (6 points) Note: This question deals with domestic migration within the United States. If a student’s answer refers to immigrants or emigrants, it must discuss their migration within the United States in order to receive credit. Explain the processes that contribute to the general patterns of migration within the United States shown on the map in terms of each of the following: 1. Economic structure (2 points) (Remember that the question asks about economic structure, not the concept of push-and-pull factors.) • Changing techniques and/or practices in primary-sector activities (mechanization, corporate farms): Loss of primary-sector jobs leads to out-migration from rural areas. • Deindustrialization: Loss of secondary-sector jobs leads to out-migration from these areas. • Shift to tertiary- and quaternary-sector jobs (high tech, recreation/resort, health care): Location of these jobs is often based on amenities and/or new technologies, which leads to in-migration to these regions. • Suburbanization: Growth of jobs in suburban areas at the expense of the city leads to inmigration to the suburbs. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 (continued) 2. Friction of distance (2 points) • Gravity model (people migrate to larger places, closer places, etc.): Areas of in-migration may be related to the amount of interaction between places (friction of distance concerns are relevant to migration decisions). • Telecommuting: It is no longer necessary to live close to work; people can locate outside of main employment centers—i.e., suburbs or beyond (friction of distance is less important than it was previously). • Suburbanization/sprawl/interregional migration: People are willing to commute or move greater distances because of improved transportation and/or communication (friction of distance is less important than it was previously). • Change in locational decision making: Footloose industries are more flexible about where they locate, including areas that were not previously part of the economic heartland; this leads to the in-migration of people for these new jobs. 3. Age structure of the population (2 points) • Retirees move to retirement areas such as the Sun Belt or Florida to take advantage of weather, amenities, etc. • Young people move to areas for more employment choices or for greater social or cultural opportunities (not for educational purposes). • Young couples with children move toward suburban locations to provide amenity-rich environments for their families. Note: In each case, students may earn 1 point for identifying the process and an additional point for explaining the connection between the process and migration. The second point must come from the explanation; it cannot be awarded for a second identification. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 Countries in the graph above have been chosen to illustrate an important trend in education patterns in the developing world. Part A (1 point) Identify the trend shown in the graph above. Acceptable answer • Part B There is a increase in girls attending secondary schools. Any plausible response that identifies this trend receives credit. (2 points: 1 point for the correct identification of an effect and 1 point for a correct explanation) Identify and explain an effect of the trend on population growth in the developing world. Identification of Effect As more girls are educated . . . • Fertility rates decrease • Population growth decreases • Crude birth rate drops • Natural increase rate slows • Developing countries may enter later stages of the demographic transition model • Total fertility rate (TFR) drops • Infant mortality rates decrease • Maternal mortality rate declines Explanation of Effect • Opportunity cost of having children increases as women are educated • Employment outside of the home increases • More opportunities less focused on the home and greater desire for/choice of a career outside • Women marry later in life, delay childbearing, and therefore have fewer children • More access to birth control, family planning • Impact on dependency ratio • Impact of the concept of demographic momentum, e.g., in India if childbearing-age females have fewer children, over time (couple of generations) population growth will slow and eventually stabilize • Women are better prepared to take better care of their children • Reduction in pregnancies and associated deaths © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 (continued) Part C (2 points: 1 point for the correct identification of an effect and 1 point for a correct explanation) Identify and explain an effect of this trend on economic development in the developing world. Identification of Effect As more girls are educated . . . • Economic development rates increase • Economy improves • Economic growth increases • Country’s wealth (GDP, GNP, PPP, GNI) increases • Literacy rates improve, leading to increases in economic development • More women go into business; more women enter the workforce Explanation of Effect • Expanded skilled/qualified labor force • Expanded workforce leads to lower wages • Better-paying jobs for women; more income to spend on family needs, including education • More productive workforce; more literate population is more economically productive • Women employed less in agriculture and more in industrial/service sectors • Targeted economic development programs from NGOs and GOs • Microindustries • Education enables women to use technology, financial skills, etc. needed to run a business • More jobs created in the secondary/tertiary sector allow women to have more disposable income • Educated women own small businesses in developing countries • Women work more in the formal, rather than informal, sector of the economy © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 (continued) Part D (2 points: 1 point for the correct identification of an effect and 1 point for a correct explanation) Identify and explain an effect of this trend on gender roles in the developing world. Identification of Effect As more girls are educated . . . • Women have more freedom, choices, respect, opportunities • Women have enhanced social/legal/socioeconomic status • Overall wellness of a society is created by gender equity • Women have more social and political rights • Women assume more positions of power • Gender empowerment measure increases • Gender gap is reduced • Women challenge traditional social norms • Women take roles traditionally held by men • Migration patterns change (at range of scales) • Social disruption may occur Explanation of Effect • Examples of these specific measures, such as more participation/leadership in the economy, society, and government; enhanced political rights • Women are hired without sexism, discrimination • Integration of women into previously maledominated workplaces/roles • Women forge careers outside of the home • Transformation of traditional male/female, husband/wife roles • Greater financial independence subverts patriarchy • Increased remittances • Higher rates of divorce; increased/decreased violence against women; fewer/more dowry deaths, honor killings, etc. © 2008 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/08/2011 for the course ENG 1502 taught by Professor Penfield during the Fall '10 term at Emory.

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