Geology notes November 3 for exam 3

Geology notes November 3 for exam 3 - Ocean sequestration...

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Geology Average global temperature has not tracked very closely with atmospheric CO2 concentrations over most of geological time. The global carbon cycle is complex so it is difficult to predict the effect(s) of adding CO2 to the atmosphere -The earth’s mantle is the primary source of CO2. It is released by volcanic eruptions. -The oceans and sedimentary rocks are the final sinks of CO2. The U.S. leads the world in CO2 emissions We can reduce CO2 emissions either by using less fossil fuel or by sequestering it after the fuel is burned. -Convert to biomass -Inject into the ocean -Convert to an inert material -Inject into the earth Terrestrial sequestration would convert CO2 into usable biomass
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Unformatted text preview: Ocean sequestration would pump CO2 into the deep ocean Mineral sequestration would react CO2 with minerals to convert it to a solid form Subsurface sequestration would inject CO2 into the earth In the U.S. there are many sedimentary formations that could host CO2 disposal-CO2 is sometimes injected into oil reservoirs in order to stimulate oil production CO2 is a highly toxic substance Eruption of CO2 Lake Nyos, Cameroon on Aug. 21, 1986 killed 1700 people and 3500 livestock. The current cost of capturing and sequestering CO2 from coal combustion ranges between $10/t and $50/t...
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This note was uploaded on 08/09/2011 for the course GEOS 1004 taught by Professor Aksinha during the Fall '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Geology notes November 3 for exam 3 - Ocean sequestration...

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