Hispanic American Diversity

Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity 1...

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Hispanic American Diversity 1 Running head: HISPANIC AMERICAN DIVERSITY Hispanic American Diversity ************ Axia College ETH 125 *********** December 19, 2009
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Hispanic American Diversity 2 Hispanic American Diversity As Hispanics from many nations immigrate to the United States, they face a number of obstacles on the course of their transition from following the ways and traditions of their home countries to those of America. While many immigrants of Latino descent share many of the same challenges, some immigrants from certain countries face specific obstacles unique to people of that nation. Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and Brazilian Americans all have unique experiences and rich cultural history to share with America. This writer will now explore the linguistic, political, social, economic, religious, and familial conventions of the four Hispanic groups mentioned above. When someone discusses Hispanics immigrating to America, usually Mexican Americans are the most commonly mentioned group, and with good reason. “A record 12.7 million Mexican immigrants lived in the United States in 2008, a 17-fold increase since 1970. Mexicans now account for 32% of all immigrants living in this country.” (Pew Research Center, 2009) Like many Latino people, many Mexican immigrants speak Spanish as their first language. According to Schaefer (2006), “about 23 percent of Mexican Americans are English dominant, 26 percent are bilingual, and 51 percent are Spanish dominant.” Mexican families tend to be tightly-knit, and this trend continues even when they immigrate to America. “Immediate family terminology is similar to most other cultures-Mama, Papa, hermano (brother), hermana (sister), but changes when other members are concerned. Primos hermanos/as, first cousins, are as close as brothers or sisters. Tias and tios (aunts and uncles) also hold special kinship.” (University of Texas-Pan American, 2000) Historically, Mexican Americans have embraced Catholicism. “In the mid- sixteenth century, Spanish Conquistadors conquered the land of Mexico, and thereafter introduced the Mexicans to Catholicism; by so doing, they forever changed the course of
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Hispanic American Diversity 3 Mexican history. Five hundred years later, most Mexican-Americans (over 80%) still practice Catholicism.” (Steiner, 2004) Despite the sheer number of Mexican Americans, they still wield relatively little political power. Low adult citizenship rates, a younger population, and low registration and voter turnout rates are key factors in this equation. The economic status of Mexican Americans has improved over the past decade or two; however, most Mexican
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This note was uploaded on 08/10/2011 for the course ETH 125 taught by Professor Jameshenderson during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity 1...

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