Bio Lab report online - Lowenberg 1 Microscopy III:...

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Lowenberg 1 Microscopy III: Measuring Daphnia Magna and Heart Rate Michelle Lowenberg Partners: David Smith, Payam Zand, Ramin Gowharriz, and Kim Biology 210A San Diego Mesa College October 28, 2010
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Lowenberg 2 Abstract : The purpose of this experiment is to discover whether or not caffeine have any effect on the heart rate of a Daphnia, a transparent freshwater crustacean. The group will be addressing the problem of whether a Daphnia’s heart rate increases when a higher concentration of caffeine is added. The methods used to find this problem out include diluting the caffeine in spring water, pipetting the Daphnia onto a slide, and then adding a drop of the desired percentage of diluted caffeine to the Daphnia. Once the slide is prepared, place it under a microscope and focus it so that you can see and count the Daphnia’s heart beats. After performing this experiment, the group discovered that the Daphnia’s heart rate does in fact increase when the concentration of caffeine is increased. Introduction : The purpose of this experiment is to discover whether or not a Daphnia’s heart rate will increase when a higher concentration of diluted caffeine is added. My group predicted that the heart rate will increase when a stronger dose of caffeine is added. This hypothesis will be tested by looking at the Daphnia’s heart under a microscope and counting its heart beats after adding the diluted caffeine. Counting the heart beats will be simple because the Daphnia’s outer carapace is transparent, making its internal organs easy to see through a microscope. Although the group will be studying the effects of caffeine on the heart rate, there are other factors involved that influence the heart rate; such as, stress, heart structural abnormalities, the temperature of the environment it’s in, and the intensity of the light used on the microscope. Daphnias are multicellular animals that are often found in freshwater and saline ponds.
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This note was uploaded on 08/10/2011 for the course BIOL 1108L taught by Professor Stanger-hall during the Spring '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Bio Lab report online - Lowenberg 1 Microscopy III:...

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