Lecture 16 - Announcements Tutorial#4 Water,runsnextweek...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 ENV200H1S Agriculture March 15, 2011 1 Announcements Tutorial #4–Water , runs next week worksheet now posted Remember best 3 out of 4 tutorials will make up 30% of your final grade 2 Outline Conservation Biology In situ strategies: size, shape, location, cost Agriculture Importance of Agriculture as an issue Major historical developments Green Revolution Current challenges of and agriculture Agriculture in Canada 3 In-situ Considerations Size Shape Cost location 4 e.g. Grizzly Bears Yellowstone is not large enough to protect a MVP of grizzlies 5 None of North America’s ‘big’ western parks, Banff, Jasper, Yellowstone are big enough to guarantee long term grizzly survival 6
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Trying to create adequate space for species with large habitat requirements underlies proposals like Y2Y or A2A 7 The 60,000 acre Osceola Okefenoke corridor cost $60M If all sections are ever completed this will be the largest corridor system in eastern North America Significant concerns have been raised as to whether scarce completed conservation dollars might be better spent on acquiring intact blocks of healthy habitat in more remote locations rather than buying strips of high priced urban and suburban land. Biodiversity Hotspots Relatively small areas of land Contain many endemic species At high risk from human activities 9 Hotspots Concept developed by British ecologist Norman Myers in 1988 identifies regions where the threat is greatest to the greatest number of species and allows conservationist to focus cost effective efforts there To qualify as a hotspot, a region must support 1,500 endemic 10 plant species (0.5% of global total) and must have lost more than 70% of its original habitat The 34 biodiversity hotspots contain 50 percent of all plant species and 42 percent of all terrestrial vertebrate species in only 2.3 percent of the planet’s land area Importance of Agriculture Estimated 9 billion people by 2050 Need to feed ~50% more people while maintaining integrity of soil, water and ecosystems Over past half century ability to produce food Over past half century, ability to produce food grown even more quickly than global population But 850 million people in developing countries do not have enough to eat. WHY? Political obstacles and inefficient distributions 11 Food Security Guarantee of an adequate, reliable and available food supply to all people at all times 12
Background image of page 2
3 Food Production Advances – Fossil Fuels Planting & harvesting more frequently Increase use of irrigation, fertilizers, pesticides Increase amount of cultivated lands Develop more productive crops & livestock
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Lecture 16 - Announcements Tutorial#4 Water,runsnextweek...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online