CHAPTER 12

CHAPTER 12 - CHAPTER 12 (cont.) - LECTURE 1: Structures of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 12 (cont.) - LECTURE 1: Structures of Solids   Crystalline  solids : well-ordered, rigid, long-range order      The molecules, atoms or ions occupy specific positions.                         Examples: quartz, salt, sugar.     Tend to melt at specific  temperatures, because crystalline         solids have a narrow range of intermolecular forces.           The shattering of crystalline materials produces          fragments having the same shape  and structural           characteristics  of the orginal sample.     Amorphous solids : molecules, atoms or ions which do NOT         have an orderly arrangement.  Examples:rubber,glass.  of temperatures,         because amorphous solids have variable          intermolecular forces.  The shattering of a glass          produces irregularly shaped  pieces with curved edges          and irregular angles.  When you heat sulfur or rubber,          these soften and melt over a broad range of          temperatures. Unit Cells  Crystals have an ordered, repeating structure.  The smallest repeating unit  in a crystal is a  unit cell .  The unit cell is the smallest unit with all the  symmetry  of         the entire crystal.  Three-dimensional stacking of the unit cells is the             crystal lattice . There are three  types of  cubic  unit cells; (there are many         other systems).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1.  Primitive   cubic : atoms at the CORNERS of a simple cube;         each atom is shared by 8 unit cells;      Z =  # of atoms per cell =      Z =  8 corners/cell x (1/8) atom/corner = 1 atom/cell 2.  Body-centered   cubic  ( bcc ): atoms at the CORNERS of a          cube plus one in the CENTER of the body of the cube;          the corner atoms are shared by 8 unit cells, and the          center atom is completely enclosed in one unit cell;      Z = # atoms per cell = (8 x 1/8) + 1 = 2 atoms/cell 3.  Face-centered   cubic  ( fcc ): atoms at the CORNERS of a          cube plus one atom in the CENTER OF EACH FACE of          the cube; the corner atoms are shared by 8 unit cells,          the face atoms are shared by 2 unit cells;    Z = # atoms per cell =(8 x 1/8)+(6 x 1/2)=4 atoms/cell The Crystal Structure of Sodium Chloride:       Face-centered cubic lattice ( fcc ).       There are two equivalent ways of defining the unit cell:
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/05/2008 for the course CHEM 116 taught by Professor Lalancette during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 8

CHAPTER 12 - CHAPTER 12 (cont.) - LECTURE 1: Structures of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online