Hispanic American Diversity

Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity...

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Hispanic American Diversity Chris Bolte ETH/125 May 8, 2011 Michael Moats
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Cuban Americans Of all the Hispanic groups in America, Cuban Americans are only third in numbers to Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans (Schaefer, 2006). According to the United States Census Bureau, there are 311,308,619 men, women, and children living in the United States as of May 7, 2011. Of this number, roughly 45,500,000 of them are Hispanic, and 1,600,000 of that Cuban Americans with majority living in Florida. Spanish is their national language and they identify them as either Roman Catholics or nonreligious. When Cuban immigrants first set foot in America, there were entering a nation committed to combating communism and blessed with a president. These early Cubans had no problems or quarrels with their host communities and enjoyed a good relationship with them. It was not until more recent times that conflicts between Cuban Americans and other American communities have increased. For instance, there has been a long standing conflict between Cuban Americans and African Americans in the state of Florida, largely due the Cuban’s political and economic involvement in the area (mostly Miami), thus becoming the dominant ethnic community of that region. Cuban Americans have acquired an enormous amount of wealth and prosperity in an extremely short period; no other immigrant group has achieved this as quickly as the Cubans. Many immigrants have never achieved it, despite being in this country far longer than Cubans. Second-generation Cuban Americans received a better education than even Anglo-Americans. More than 26.1% of second- generation Cuban Americans had a bachelor's degree or better versus 20.6% of Anglos. Thus Cuban Americans in 1997 were approximately 25% more likely to have a college degree than Anglos. Other Hispanic groups lag far behind. Only 18.1% of South Americans had a bachelor's or better. Puerto Ricans, despite being U.S. citizens by birth, recorded a disappointing 11%; Mexicans only 7%. In 1997, 55.1% of second-generation Cuban Americans had an income greater than $30,000 versus 44.1% of Anglo- Americans. Thus Cuban Americans are approximately 20% more likely to earn more than $30,000 than their Anglo-American counterparts. All other Hispanic groups lag far behind in average income. In 1997, 36.9% of second-generation Cuban Americans had an income greater than $50,000 versus 18.1% of Anglo-Americans. Cuban Americans were twice as likely to earn more than $50,000. Also, approximately 11% of Cuban Americans had incomes greater than $100,000 versus 9% of Anglo-Americans, and less than 2% of other Hispanics. Cubans comprise less than 4% of the U.S. Hispanic population, Mexicans 65%, Puerto Ricans 10%, Central and South Americans 11%, and "others" 10%, yet of the top 100 richest Hispanics in the United States, more than 50% are of Cuban descent (10 times what it should be on a population basis), and 38% of Mexican descent. The rest is scattered among all other Hispanic groups
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2011 for the course ETH 125 taught by Professor Jameshenderson during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity...

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