Labor Relations Course Project

Labor Relations Course Project - 1 Labor Relations:...

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Labor Relations: Analysis on Women in the Workplace Liliana Hernandez-Corniel Labor Relations, HR586, Section T Professor Jermaine A. Robinson June 14, 2011 1
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Introduction More and more women have been entering the job market in the years since World War II and not to mention higher-level positions. This trend was noted by 1960, but the size of the trend was underestimated. By the mid-1970s, women had entered the job market at rates not expected to be reached until the mid-1980s, and it was reported then that nearly 48 percent of American women over sixteen years of age either worked or wanted a job. Numerous reasons were given for this, including a growing number of young single women looking for their first jobs, newly divorced women with little or no income from their former husbands, women whose husbands did not earn enough so that the family needed a second salary, and women from higher income families who had a desire for broader horizons as a primary reason for working. Also cited for this rise was the liberation of young wives in the 1960s with economic liberation and effective birth control methods. While women have managed to make advances in the business world, they have clearly not achieved the equality they have sought. They are also subject to a wide variety of on-the-job discrimination and require 2
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legal protection, and such protection has been embodied in federal and state law, administrative regulations, and case law. Women in the Workplace According to a study by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the occupational distribution of women has long shown a significant difference from that of males. According to 1967 data, women had much lower occupational distribution rates in traditionally non-female jobs than white males and much higher rates in the traditional female jobs. Only 35 percent of all women workers were found in traditionally non-female jobs, while 59 percent of the work force was in such jobs and 72 percent of all white male workers. It is assumed that this distribution is not accidental and that instead it is the result of deliberate employment decisions intended to limit or concentrate female employment into certain job categories (Humphrey, 1977, p. 11). Some improvements in the plight of women in the workplace were made between the first EEOC study in 1966 and the second in 1975, but it was found that women were still accorded 3
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somewhat different treatment than white male workers. Women showed a marked shift from blue-collar to white-collar jobs, and within the white-collar field, only office/clerical jobs declined as a percent of all jobs. Changes in the occupational distribution patterns for white men and all women moved in the same general direction, but women continued to have lower occupational distribution rates than those white males in jobs not traditionally held by women. Nearly 34 percent of all female employment in 1975 was in traditionally non-female jobs, compared to nearly 58 percent of the total workforce and about
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Labor Relations Course Project - 1 Labor Relations:...

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