chapter2m211 - Math 211 Lecture II Chapter 2 Frequency...

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Math 211 Lecture II Chapter 2 - Frequency Distributions Data: A collection of values to be used for statistical analysis. Raw Data: Collected data which does not need to be numerical. i.e. set of weights of certain set of students, days of the week, etc. Array: Arrangement of raw numerical data in ascending or descending order. Range: Maximum data – minimum data. Class Interval: A class interval is a division of data for use in Histogram (a type of Bar graph) . For instance, it is possible to partition scores on a 100 point test into class intervals of 1-25, 26- 49, 50-74 and 75-100. The end numbers are called class limits ; the smaller numbers are Lower Class Limits (LCL) and the larger numbers are the Upper Class Limits (UCL). The numbers 0.5- 25.5, 25.5-49.5, 49.5-74.5, 74.5-100.5 are called class boundaries . For example 0.5 is a lower class boundary and 25.5 is an upper class boundary of the first class. Class Interval Size (widthness=c): Upper class boundary – lower class boundary. Class Frequency: Number of individuals belonging to each class. Class Mark(CM): The midpoint of the class interval. 2 LCL UCL CM + = or 2 LCB UCB CM + = . Frequency Tables (Frequency Distributions): The first step in drawing a frequency distribution is to construct a frequency table. A frequency table is a way of organizing the data by listing every possible score (including those not actually obtained in the sample) as a column of numbers and the frequency of occurrence of each score as another. Simply a frequency distribution is an arrangement of data by classes together with the corresponding class frequency.
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