Time - -»~..‘ n.| vets-Verve...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: -»~... -...»...-...-....‘;-_-. n--.|._ vets-Verve ‘hlll‘Ul‘I—nltllfiu Chronemics is the study of how we use time to communicate. While some people are preoccupied with time, others regularly waste it. While some. are typically early, others are chronically late. While some travel through life with a sense of urgency, others ambie through it at a more leisurely pace. Some peo~ plc function best in the morning (the early birds), while Others perform best at night (the night owls). Do you have enough time for most of your aetivities? Are you usually prepared for exams or assignments? Do you arrive for appointments on time, early, or late? Edward I-Iall says that L‘time talks.”36 What does your use or misuse of time say about you? To what extent do others communicate with you by their use of time? Would you feel insulted if you were asked Out for a date at the last minute by someone you did not know very well? (In the United States, at least, a last~rninure invitation is often assumed to indicate that another date fell through or that the inviter is asking only as a last resort.) Some students have a habit ofalways being 15 minutes late to class-— even when their previous class was jusc down the hall. What cues does such habitual lateness transmit to an instructor? Should the instructor conclude that the student is not interested in the class? That the student does not like the instructor? That the student is unable to organize activities to accomplish even the simplest goal? . J’tmcrimliry is an important factor in time communication. Misunder- standings, miscalcularions, or disagreements involving time can create commu- nication and relationship problems. Differences in interpreting the words an time, for example, reveal differences in individuals’ understanding of and approach to the concept of punctuality. Being on time for a job interview, for instance, is different from being on time for a party. The latter usually allows for more flexibility than the former. Many jobs demand that the worker be on time. To a military officer, being on time really means arriving 15 minutes early. Thus, the armed forces are characterized by the “hurry up and wait" mentality familiar to anyone in basic training. That is, everyone rushes to arrive, but then everyone stands around fora period of time with norhing to do. I Would you make real estate tycoon Donald Trump wait for a meeting with you, or would you arrive on time or even early? When negotiating a real estate transaction, :1 group of Chinese millionaires once made Trump wait for them—close to an hour. Do you feel that they were sending a message? Another important factor in time communication is the allocation of cer- tain activities to appropriate timer. It is acceptable to call a friend for a chat at 3 PM. However, we know of an attorney who goes to work at 5:30 AM. and by 6:30 AM. has already made phone calls to a number of people. (How would you react ifyou were called by a lawyer at 5:30 in the morning?) He does this, he reports, because it gets results: people’s “defenses are'down” at 5:30 ital/1.; consequently, they often reveal things they would be prepared to cOver up by 9 or 10 o’clock. e”... uuu “to-“4 um. HHHUJIItJIJJIIK—ha earthly-nu). stun—nun“ uu.)l1h..‘t.\l.ll..U}Jll;, IUl instance, seek the greatest return on their “time investment." In other coun- tries, however, time is treated differently. ln some cultures, people are accus— tomed to waiting several hours for a meeting to begin. In others, the meeting begins whenever the second party arrives. The following is an example of how the concept of structuring time is culturally determined: A Chinese official matter-of~ihetly informed an ARCO manager that China would one day be the number one nation in the world. The American said he did not doubt that, considering the size of the country and its popular tion, and the tremendous technological progress that will be made, but he asked, “When do you think that China will be number one?" The Chinese responded, “Oh, in four or five hundred years.“37 Even within the United States people structure time differently. 'People from the northeast, for example, usually walk and talk more quickly, provide change more quickly in shops, and are more likely to wear a watch than people from other parts of the country. The authors come from two different regions of the country, and it has taken years ofmarried life lior them to adjust to each other’s “internal clock." (One of them can start and ne:1rly complete a task before the other manages to be seated.) The phrase it {any time can mean one thing to one person and something completely different to another. How long we wait for something or someone is related, first, to the value we place on whatever it is we are waiting for and, second, to our own status. We are taught to value what we wait list. In fact, if something is too readily available, we may decide we don‘t want it after all. Status determines-who waits. Ifwe are “important,” Others usually have access to us only by appoint- ment; thus, it is easier for us to make others wait—and dillicult or impossible for others to make us wait. As the psychologist Robert Levine writes: Time is pOwer. With status, then, comes the power to control time, your own and others’. Those who control othets’ time have power and those who have power control others‘ time. There is no greater symbol ofdomi- nation, since time cannot be replaced once it is gone.3H How well do you structure your time? in his book The Time Trap, Alex MacKenzie lists several barriers to effective use oftime: Attempting too much (taking on too many projects at once) _ Estimating time unrealistically (not realizing how long a project will take) Procrastinating (putting it off, and off, and off. . .) Allowing too many interruptions (letting yourself be distracted by telephone calls, friends, and so on)” Do any ofthese apply to you? How might you go about improving your use of time? (bf/271?? a x? r‘ (42296-2; (0297" /rj 11:7 [2% Mtg/:47 5/ [HT/A54 ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern