Notes 01-31-11

Notes 01-31-11 - The Global Trade Environment World Trade...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Global Trade Environment World Trade Brief History of International Business Trade Patterns U.S. Trade Position Importance of World Trade Balance of Payments A Diagnosis of the U.S. Trade Position Falling Dollar Protectionism vs. Free Trade Tariff and Non-Tariff Barriers Easing Trade Restrictions World Trade Organization (WTO) International Monetary Fund (IMF) World Bank
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style World Trade
Background image of page 2
The Twentieth to the Twenty-First Century First Half of the Twentieth Century Depression & Turning away from international trade: Protectionism: the Smoot- Hawley Act The Act raised import duties to reduce the volume of imports into the United States, with the intent of fostering increased domestic employment. World trade collapsed as other nations countered with raised duties and tariffs of their own. The act raised tariffs on more than 20,000 imported goods to more than 60%.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Twentieth to the Twenty-First Century Last Half of the Twentieth Century Marshall Plan The post-war East and West ideological split has implication for trade relations: The Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA or COMECON) developed strong linkages among the members and discourage relations with the West. 53 Western countries Belief: “International trade is the key to worldwide prosperity” . The International Trade Organization (ITO)
Background image of page 4
World Trade and U.S. Multinationals 1950s, many U.S. companies that had never before marketed outside the U.S. began to export, and others made significant investments in marketing and production facilities overseas. 1960s, U.S. multinational corporations (MNCs) were facing major challenges on two fronts: Resistance to direct investment Increasing competition in export markets American MNCs were confronted by a resurgence of competition from all over the world. NIC (Newly Industrialized Countries)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Trade Patterns The importance of world trade: Import and export growth has outpaced the rate of GNP increase. The Triad countries account for two-thirds of world exports and imports. A new reality: capital movements have replaced trade as the driving force of the world economy Services Trade :
Background image of page 6
Top Exporters in 2009 ___In US$ billions____ 1. China 1,194 2. Germany 1,187 3. U.S 994 4. Japan 516 5. France 456 6. Netherlands 397 7. Italy 369 8. South Korea 355 9. U.K. 351 10. Hong Kong 326 ___In US$ billions___ 1. U.S. 1,445 2. Germany 1,022 3. China 921 4. France 532 5. Japan 490 6. U.K. 473 7. Italy 358 8. Netherlands 358 9. Hong Kong 345 10. Canada 305 Top Importers
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Top Importers ___In US$ billions____ 1. Germany 1,334 2. China 1,217 3. U.S 1,149 4. Japan 676 5. France 548 6. Italy 501 7. Netherlands 457 8. Canada 433 9. Great Britain 441 10. South Korea 371 ___In US$ billions___ U.S. 1,965 Germany 1,089 China
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 44

Notes 01-31-11 - The Global Trade Environment World Trade...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online