Literature Across Borders

Literature Across Borders - Julianna Ritter 4/4/2011...

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Unformatted text preview: Julianna Ritter 4/4/2011 “Kreutzer Sonata” Although Tolstoy’s “Kreutzer Sonata” is fairly short, it is not without various thoughtful nuances that reflect Tolstoy’s personal philosophy. The setting is that on a train, what can be considered a phallic object in perpetual movement throughout the tale. The significance of the physical setting not only heightens the literary atmosphere but helps shape the narrative. The story begins with a moment on the train where the narrator indicates this is not an individual trip by opening up with the sentence, “It was early spring, and the second day of our journey” (134). Immediately we understand two things: the narrator is not the main character in Tolstoy’s story and that there is a kind of unspoken intimacy between the narrator and the other (primarily anonymous) figure who makes up the second half of the possessive case “our.” However our other anticipated hero is not introduced to readers until after the narrator lists a few secondary...
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This note was uploaded on 08/15/2011 for the course COMP LIT 201 taught by Professor Parker during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Literature Across Borders - Julianna Ritter 4/4/2011...

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