Notes on The Dark Child

Notes on The Dark Child - Julianna Ritter 2/21/2011 The...

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Julianna Ritter 2/21/2011 The Dark Child Camara Laye’s work The Dark Child presents a literature discourse to a long history of the French colonialism in Africa. There are layers upon layers of national identity issues within the novel. While Camara’s character in the semi-autobiographical novel is represented under the colonialism of France in West Africa, he is inherently linked to his religious respect and practice of the Koran while still maintaining traditional aspects of his West African tribe. Laye’s work is important in its dignified representation of Africans since these perspectives were often absent in colonialism literature and became part of the “negritude movement” of France after WWII. In chapter seven, there is a special emphasis placed upon “Konden Diara.” In the novel Konden Diara is presented to readers as Camara’s childhood fear. Chapter seven is also the same chapter in which Laye describes the process of initiation into manhood. With the novel’s
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Notes on The Dark Child - Julianna Ritter 2/21/2011 The...

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