Lect2-Nutrition-1

Lect2-Nutrition-1 - Lecture 2: The Nutritional Poverty Trap...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Lecture 2: The Nutritional Poverty Trap January 12, 2011 Econ 325: Development Economics Professor Nancy Qian Agenda Questions from last time Stylized facts about nutrition and poverty A model of the nutritional poverty trap Question What is the relationship between nutrition and poverty? Observations Survey of 1,042 household representative of Seva Mandir work area in Udaipur, Rajastan Poor sample frame even by Indian Standard (monthly Rs 470, 40% of the households are below the poverty line) Health status is bad 53% of men and 51% of women are anemic (using gender adjusted measures) BMI is 17.8 for adult men, 18.1 for adult women. 93% of adult women and 88% of adult men have BMI less that 21, the cutoff for low nutrition in the US 1/3 of individuals report symptoms over the last 30 days, 12% are serious Poor people are in worst health (BMI, SRHS, anemia) Approximately 300 million undernourished Muscle retardation Vulnerability to infection Retardation of brain development May lower life expectancy Children especially vulnerable Poor are More Malnourished Generally, it is the landless or "absolute poor" who go hungry no non-wage income Why don't they get a job, earn money and get food? One commonly used explanation: They do, but wages are not high enough for workers to buy sufFcient food Who Gets Jobs? A puzzling observation Some among the absolute poor do get jobs. On observables, they look the similar to those that do not get jobs Economic explanation The labor market doesn't clear such that there is involuntary unemployment (people who are willing to work cannot fnd jobs) Natural questions Why doesn't the labor market clear? Why doesn't the unemployed simply work at lower wages than the employed and undercut the latter? Model of the Nutritional Poverty Trap Das Gupta and Ray (1986) Capacity to work: " What do they mean by capacity? Refers to physical strength motivation concentration cognitive faculty morbidity How much one can work depends on how much nourishment he/she gets We can denote the relationship between work capacity and consumption (nutrition) as: " (I) " (I) How do Dasgupta and Ray characterize this relationship?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/12/2011 for the course ECON 325 taught by Professor Nancyqian during the Spring '11 term at Yale.

Page1 / 47

Lect2-Nutrition-1 - Lecture 2: The Nutritional Poverty Trap...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online