6.1 - Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/17/11 Basics of...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/17/11
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8/17/11 Basics of Sensation Sensation vs. perception Sensation : process of detecting external phenomena and converting that information into neural signals ( transduction ) Perception : selecting, organizing, and interpreting sensory information
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8/17/11 3 Basics of Sensation Bottom-up processing Combining basic sensations to make a whole perception
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8/17/11 4 Basics of Sensation Top-down processing Using pre-existing facts or knowledge to interpret incoming stimuli T H E C H T
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8/17/11 Limits to Sensation Range of stimuli Vision Hearing Taste Smell Duration of stimuli Intensity of stimuli
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8/17/11 Limits to Sensation Limits to sensation Results in absolute threshold Minimum stimulation needed to detect stimulus 50% of the time Assessed using concept of difference threshold , or “just noticeable difference” (jnd) Slight differences between conscious and unconscious jnds (e.g., in duration) makes unconscious priming possible But this is minimal and fleeting
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8/17/11 JNDs Jnds vary by context Weber’s Law: jnd increases in proportion to the size of a stimulus Applies to a wide variety of stimuli Reflected in measurement systems (e.g., dB, Richter scale) May apply to more complex phenomena, as well e.g., spending
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8/17/11 JNDs Jnds vary by context Prior stimulation leads to lower sensitivity Process of sensory adaptation Helps us ignore background information about environment Makes novel or different stimuli stand out more
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8/17/11 Vision Detecting light energy and turning it into signals in the brain ( phototransduction ) Light energy carried by photons Photons emitted (or reflected) by light sources in waves Waves are responsible for two basic elements of visual stimuli: Hue (color) Intensity (brightness)
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8/17/11 Vision Hue is determined by the wavelength of light Distance between light “pulses” 400 nm 700 nm Long wavelengths Short wavelengths Violet Indigo Blue Green Yellow Orange Red
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8/17/11 Vision We can only see photons in certain wavelengths About 400-700 nm
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8/17/11 Vision Intensity is determined by the amplitude of light Size of the light “pulses”
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8/17/11 Vision Intensity is determined by the amplitude of light Size of the light “pulses”
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8/17/11 Vision Light of varying wavelength and intensity detected by the eye
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6.1 - Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/17/11 Basics of...

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