MA2010FallNewsletterpluscourses.7_22_10

MA2010FallNewsletterpluscourses.7_22_10 - 6% New York...

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Unformatted text preview: 6% New York University A private university in the public service Arts and Science Department of Economics i9 West Fourth Street, 6th Floor New York, NY 100124119 Teiephone: (212) 9983900 FAX: (212) 995-4} 86 July 2010 MEMORANDUM TO: MA. Students FROM: David Harper, DGS — MA. Program Marjorie Lessor, Graduate Coordinator Nicki Rivers, Administrative Assistant RE: Fall 2010 Course Scheduie & Registration Information 1. REGISTRATION: Classes for fall semester begin on Tuesday, September 7th. Please find attached the course offerings for fall 2010. (NOTE: THE FALL SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE so please check with the department before the stari: of the term.) Registration for GSAS courses is done via Albert and is available as follows: GSAS FALL 2010 Stem Fall Registration Period (done through our See MA Weicome booklet distributed by Nicki deartmcnt Rivers (21526 a n . bookiet from Nicki Rivers for details Labor Da ~ Holida Monday, Setember 6 First Day of Class Fall 2010 Semester; last day to Withdraw Tuesday, September 7 from ciasses & receive a 100% refund of both tuition & fees. To view the fall 2008 refund period, see www.n u.edulbursar/refunds Late Reistratin Fee be ins Tuesda , Setember 14 Graduate Mail Pa ment Deadiine Wednesda ", Setember 22 Last Day of Initial On—line Re istration Monda , Setember 27 last da to dro without a ; 'ade of "W" Coiumbus Da — No ciasses scheduled {hanksivim Recess Thursda ', November 25—Saturda , November 27 Le islative Da w classes meet on Thursda schedule Leisiative Da _ classes meet on Manda schedule Last Da of Ciasses Fall 2010 Semester Wednesda , December 15 Fali Final Exams Frida , geoember i7-Thursda , December 23 Winter Recess December 24~Saturda , Janna 22, ii Martin Luther Kin Jr. Da — Hoiida Monda , Janua 17, 20“ Srin 2011 Semester Beins Student advisement during registration: Ms. Nicki Rivers should be your first contact person for most queries. If you have questions about how to register or which courses to register for, you should contact Nicki at 212-998—8933 or email: vr26§£0nyuedu If, after contacting Nicki, you require advisement of a more complex nature, you may wish to contact Professor Harper by email at davidli er a uedu. Beginning in the fall, he will hold his regular office hours on Tuesdays, 3:00— 5:00 pm. in room 825, 19 West 4“ Street. To schedule almeeting with Professor Harper during these office hours, please contact Nicki. Marge Lesser is also available to assist with registration and can be reached at mar";orie.lesser@nyu.edu (212—998-8923). In planning your program, please remember that core courses should precede elec‘tiVes. Also, pay attention to prerequisites; for example, "Math for Economists" ((331.1001) is needed to take "Microeconomics" (G3l .1003). (The core courses are: 631.1001 Math for Economists; (331.1003 Microeconomics; GBUOOS Macroeconomics; G31.1101 Applied Statistics & Econometrics i; and G31.i 102 Applied Statistics & Econometrics II. Please note that each core has its own recitation or lab section for which you must also officially register). Note: MA Courses in the Stern Schooi of Business and in our Department of Economics do NOT need any approval from Professor Harper. Howover, any non-Stern course or any course NOT listed on the attached course schedule MUST have the written approval of Professor Harper. To register for a course outside the Department of Econdmics (EXCEPT for a course in Stern), you must submit the form MAB “Permission to Take Course Outside Economics Department (GSAS) To Be Credited Toward M.A. Degree (Econ)”. Once you have your course information, student ED. and pin numbers, you will be ready to register via Albert (http://www.albertnyuedw) or your NYU Horne account. Piease keep in mind that the act of registering generates related tuition charges FOR WHICH YOU ARE FINANCIALLY RESPONSIBLE. Even if no payment is due, you must officially drop or withdraw from courses BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS in order to cancel all charges incurred by registering. ' II. “MATH BOOT CAMP” for Incoming Students August Math Review Course for Students in Masters of Economics Program From Monday through Wednesday, August 30 through September 1, the Economics Department will offer a three—day noncredit math review course (or mini ‘math boot camp’) for students enrolled in the Masters in Economics program. The goal of the mini—course is to provide a review of the math required for the regular Mathematics for Economists course (331.1001) and other courses in the MA curriculum. The course will review basic set theory, derivatives, basic principles of integration and the foundations of matrix aigebra. Knowledge of these topics will be assumed in the Mathematics for Economists course. Students whose calculus and basic iinear algebra skills are rusty or who have a limited math background are STRONGLY encouraged to attend. The mini—course will have morning and afternoon sessions on each of the three days. The sessions will run from 9:00 am. to 12:00 noon and from 1:00 pm. until 3:00 pm. There will be a one hour lunch 2 break. The course will be taught by professors Seyhan Arkonac (Seyhan.Arkonac@NYU.edu) and Jim Hodge (JHH301@NYULedu), the teachers for the regular Mathematics for Economists course, and will consist of lectures interspersed with inmciass problems and exercises. The mini—course will use Mathematical and Computational Economics by Karman Dadkhah (Thomson—Southwestern, 2007) and will be availabie in the NYU bookstore; it will also be on reserve at the library. Students without a substantial math background are encouraged to acquire the text for their personal library. Students should contact Nicki Rivers at vr26@fl nyu.edu or (212) 998~8933 to Sign up for the course. To attend this review course, you must also register for either G31.i003 .01 or G31.1001.02 Math for Economists in fall 2008. There are no extra fees for doing the review course. Please feel free to contact Professors Arkonac or Hodge for further details. III. COURSES 1N STERN As in the past, Econ students who wish to take courses at Stern must register through our department {to access the "Stern Reservation Sheet" go to www.n.yu.edu/econ , click on “Graduate Programs,” “MA,” “Forms” to download the Stern form; once you have completed it, please submit it to Nicki. There is no “approved” list for Stern courses; you may take any graduate level Stern course of interest to you without approval from Professor Harper. However, it is important that you have the prerequisites for Stern courses and you must provide us with proof of this before we can submit your request to the Stern Registrar. if you are indoubt about any prerequisite, place see the relevant instructor at Stern or check the Stern bulletin. It is Stern policy that you may take up to but no more than 6 credits per term. Note: some Stern core courses and “alternate delivery I classes” are restricted and may not be avaiiable to you. Please keep this in mind when planning for Stern courses and select courses for non—Stern students only. You have. already received an email from Nicki regarding the dates for Stem registration. (Please note that 8-9 credits from Stern or any department outside of the Economics Department may be applied toward the MA. You need at least 23-24 credits of G31 courses to meet the NYS residency requirement. Ifyou wish to appiy nine (9) credits of appropriate external coursework toward your MA in Economics, piease get email approval from Professor Harper and forward your request and his approval to Marge at m16@nyu.edu. This is for graduation purposes.) IV. RULES & POLICIES Three important rules/policies Were recently announced by the dean’s office and are posted here for your information: 1. Thirty~two (32) credits are the maximum number of credits you can take for the MA. degree. 2. The Department’s policy is that all courses taken count toward your cumuiative GPA. Hence, every course taken in the Stern Schooi of Business or in the Courant Institute (i.e., Math Department) contributes toward your cumulative GPA. 3. You can only re—take a course if you did poorly the first time due to "factors beyond your control" and if you have written permission from'the Director of Graduate Studies. The Department wiil apply a high threshold in applying this policy - the factors must truly be beyond your control. V. F ALL COURSES Two sections of each of the core courses and recitationsfor each will be offered during the fall semester. In addition, we will also be offering a variety of electives, listed below with brief summaries to assist in determining your fall schedule. In addition, “Income Distribution in the US.” (G31.1108) and the “Colloquium on Market Institutions and Economic Processes? (G31.3462) are open to both l’hD. and M.A students (these are 4 point courses). “4 Please note that MA. & M.A./Ph.D. courses in our department REMAIN 3 credits each, while courses designated Ph.DIM.A. or x—listed with Politics, History, Center for European Studies and/or Wagner School of Public Service are 4 credits each. Electives with brief summaries: 7” G31.i4€)2.01 (call # 30368) “Money anti Banking” will be taught by Professor Bruce Skoorka and is scheduied to meet Thursday, 6:20'~8:20 pm. in the Waverly Building, room 366. This course provides a comprehensive survey of money, banking and financial institutions The objective is to provide an understanding of the economic processes governing the function of the banking system and to analyze the operations of the financial intermediaries and commercial banking institutions as receivers of savings and as resources of money and credit. Topics include financial intermediation, the structure, function and performance of the banking system, the international financial system and international banking (including a discussion of Euromarkets, regulation and deregulation, commercial banking and the process of deposit creation by commercial banks, bank off~balance sheet transactions, the role and function of money and the central bank, the payment system and systemic risk, the process of monetary controls, and monetary policy. Important issues of current interest in banking and cross— country differences in regulation, policy and technology will also be discussed. ** ** G3l 3001.003 (call it 30386) “Topics in Economics: Economic Analysis of Politics” ~ unfortunately, We have had to cancel this course for the fall 2010 term. ** G31.3001.005 (call # 30388) “Topics in Economics: Foundations of Financiai Economics” will be taught by Professor Tanju Yorulmazer is scheduled to meet on Tuesdays, 6:20-8:20 pm. in room C- 10, 25 West 4‘11 Street. The course outline will be available before the start of the fa]! 2010 term. Professor Yorulrnazer received his PhD degree from the New York University’s Department of Economics and is now employed at the New York Fed. His research has been in the areas of finance and banking. ** (313001.008 (call # 30391) “Topics in Economics: Privatization will be taught by Professor Jonas Prager and will meet on Tuesdays, 6:20—8:20 pm. at 19 West 43‘ Street, room 802. The course is comprised of two sections —- the instructor and the student. Roughly the first half consists ofa survey of privatization issues as per a syllabus that you'll find at www.cconnyu.edur’dept/courses/prager/privsf02.pd£ (Past lecture notes can be found at www.cconnyu.edu/deptfcoui'ses/prager/SEMNOTOZ.pdf ) It is not expected that you will read all the materiai, but it is suggested that you acquire the World Bank, Bureaucrats in Business volume and begin to read the relevant chapters. it‘s an excellent summary of the problems facing statewowned enterprises, the candidates for privatization, in much of the world. You might also wish to read B.S. Savas, Privatization and PublicuPrivate Partnerships for an. excellent 4 overview. The following topics will be discussed: the presumed failure of state-owned enterprises and the proposals for reform, improving the efficiency of "inherently governmental functions" basically via contracting processes, the role of ownership vs. competition as a determinant of efficiency, and issues in privatization such as corporate governance, divestiture, and employment. The instructor’s tentative general conclusion will be that no general conclusion can be reached. Much depends on the particular circumstances in the country under discussion, for clearly the problems and hence the solutions facing 80133 in France differ from those in Poland and in Rwanda. Moreover, privatization itself may create new problems that need to be considered. It is doubtful that the instructor will have time to discuss privatization in specific countries or specific industries so this is where you, the students, come in. The second half of the semester is devoted to student papers. it is expected that each student will suggest a topic dealing with some aspect of privatization and provide the instructor with a proposed outline. ** (313002.003 (call # 31271) “Topics in Economics: Economic Analysis of Property and Contract Law” will be taught by Professor David Harper and is scheduled to meet on Mondays, 4th— 6:10 at 19 West 4m Street, room 624. This course provides an overview of the basic concepts, principles and tools of the economics of law (also known as "law and economics"). The focus is upon application to business, regulatory and policy issues. Economics has emerged as a powerful and general tool of analysis for rational study of the law. It examines the efficiency of alternative legal rules and their effects on the functioning of the economic system and the distribution of wealth. in some areas, the economics of law has provoked intense controversy in its analysis of such questions as: Is the common law (is. judge~made law) the result of efforts to induce efficient outcomes? How do changes in bankruptcy rules affect the allocation of resources? Should insider trading be allowed? Should managers be permitted to use defensive tactics in the event of a possible takeover by another firm? Should dominant firms be subject to severe antitrust regulation and the threat of break~up? 7”“ 631.3092.805 (call # 31273) “Topics in Economics: Tracking the U.S. Economy” will be taught by Professor Edward Steinberg and is scheduled to be given on Thursdays, 6:20-8:20 pm. at 19 West 4th Street, room 624. This course focuses on an understanding of the meaning, strengths, and weaknesses of the major macroeconomic indicators that are used to measure the performance of the U.S. economy, suoh as GDP, the unemployment rate, measures of employment, various price indexes, leading, lagging and coincident indexes, and others. The course seeks to answer questions such as: Why is the unemployment rate a less-than-perfeet gauge of the health of the economy? How can GDP data provide a misleading impression of how the economy is performing? Why do different measures of inflation and of employment sometimes produce very different results? The course will be especially useful to students whose work involves the use of macro indicators and an understanding of current business conditions. ** G31.3002.006 (call # 31274) “Topics in Economics: Advanced Econometrics I” will be taught by Professor Bruce McNevin and is scheduled to meet on Mondays, 6:20—8:20 pm. at 19 West 4‘“ Street in room 736. This course focuses on econometric methods and applications used in empirical microeconornic research. The course material is divided into two sections: Methods and Models. The Methods section covers topics relating to estimation methodology including generalized method of moments, maximum likelihood, non-parametric and semiwparametric estimation techniques, numerical optimization, and bootstrapping. The second section covers specific models including hazards, nested legit, mixed legit, and count data models. The last lecture is an introduction to Bayesian estimation methods, which will be covered in detail in AdVanced Econometrics 11. The emphasis of the course is on applications. STATA will be used extensively. ' ** (3313002007 (call # 31275) Topics in Economics: Advanced Microeconomics” will be taught by Professor Charles Wilson and will meet on Wednesdays, 6:30—8:40 pm. at 19 West 4‘" Street in room 736. This course provides a firm grounding in general eduilibrium theory. The course investigates the implications of various sources of market imperfections for the performance of markets. It provides students with a rigorous approach to studying one of the main mathematical models used. in economic analysis. The topics covered include the basic properties of the general equilibrium model, Pareto optimality, the First and Second Welfare Theorems, tax distortions, incomplete markets, the overlapping generations model, and markets with asymmetric information. Each of these topics will be studied within the context of a common mathematical model. Considerable emphasis is pieced on constructing and analyzing simple general equilibrium models used in international trade, public finance, and macroeconomics. Prerequisites: G3 H003 and at least two semesters of calculus. The course will be taught by Professor Charles Wilson, a full-time faculty member with expertise in microeconomic theory, game theory, decision theory and experimental economics. ** (2313002008 (call # 31305) “Topics in Economics: Advanced Mathematical Economics” will be taught by Professor Kevin Thorn and is scheduled to meet on Tuesdays, 6:008:00 pm. at i9 West 4‘“ Street in room 624. This course provides students with further mathematical techniques necessary for rigorous economic analysis. We will start by considering basic concepts in set theory and methods for proving mathematical propositions. The first major section of the course will be devoted to presenting elements of real analysis. Often economists are interested in Optimization problems: consumers maximizing utility, firms maximizing profits, and so forth. Our discussion of topics real analysis will allow us to ansvter questions relevant for the solution of these problems, leading up to the statement and proof of Kuhnu’l‘ucker theorem. The second part of the course will be devoted to more applied concepts related to solving the types of optimization problems that are common in economic analysis. We will investigate the solutions to dynamic optimization problems in which agents make optimal choices overtime, and past choices affect future choices. If time permits, we will also introduce numerical methods for finding the optima of functions. ** (3313002009 (call #31306) “Topics in Economics: Applied Game Theory” will be taught by Professor Andrew Miller and will meet on Thursdays, 6:20-8:20 in room 736 at 19 West 4‘“ Street. This course will have an applied focus and will cover the foundations of modern game theory including: static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information. The course will also examine some difficulties in applying game theory such as the choice and relevance of equilibria concepts and defining and maintaining the rules of the game. Applications may include: various models in industrial organization (how to compete as a company in the marketplace), regulation (how to compete when regulated, how to regulate), labor markets (how to get a job), learning and information (how to exploit asymmetries and gaps in information), bargaining (how to negotiate), and others. Students registering for this course are encouraged to have a working knowledge of advanced calculus, optimization, and probability but the course will be selfucontained. ** 61313200001 (call it 30402) “Special Projects in Economic Research” — will be taught by Dr. David C. Garlow and is scheduled to meet on Tuesdays, 6:20—8:20 pm. at E9 West 4* Street in room 736. in this course students will examine several types of country risk in emerging markets that affect foreign investment, including expropriation, currency crises, contract repudiation and political violence up to and including war. After surveying the historical record as well as existing theoretical models, each team will rank the riskiness of a sample of unnamed countries from the standpoint of a foreign direct investor and from the standpoint of a long-term portfolio investor. Each group will then compare and contrast current ratings provided by two or more publicly available ratings of country risk, from the 6 standpoint of different client groups. Finally students will attempt to explain some of the major historical surprises (failures) in country risk analysis. Alternatively, we will examine the costs and likelihood of different efforts to improve a country’s risk rating. To register for this course, email Nicki at vr26@nyu.eclu for your access code. “'9' G31.3200.002 (call # 30403) “Special Projects in Economic Research” will be led by Dr. Alonso and will meet on Wednesdays, 6:208:20 pm. in the Silver Building, room 512. This section will focus on banking and credit market issues. Students will collaborate in group projects on a variety of banking and credit market issues. These are research projects: the group must research existing literature on the question they are investigating, motivate the question (i.e., why it matters), formulate a specific hypothesis related to the topic (or challenge another), collect and analyze related data, and draw conclusions. The final product will be a substantial paper and polished powerpoint presentation to the rest of the class. The model is a consulting project, wherein the client approaches you with some vague ideas or concerns (like those above), and your group frames the issue, raises the interesting questions, answers them authoritatively, and presents the findings to the “client” (and the rest of the class). The class will operate seminar style: some readings will be assigned initially to generate discussion and form groups of people with like-minded interests. Once projects are underway, there will be “one-on— one” meetings between individual groups the professor (to assess progress, etc.) or class—wide meetings to comment on others projects. To register for this course, email Nicki at vr26@_ nyuedu for your access code. ** G31.3200.003 (call # 30404) “Special Projects in Economic Research” will be led by Dr. Ashley Timmer and will meet on Mondays, 6:20-8:20 pm. in room 624, 19 West 4“ Street. This Special Projects course focuses on the institutional and behavioral dimensions of economic development. Each week, we will examine a particular topic in development using economic approaches that move beyond the simple neoclassical model. Themes include the political-economy of development, risk and vulnerability, social capital, ethnic networks, otherwregarding behavior, inequality, behavioral finance, and conflict and instability. Students will work in teams to lead class discussions and prepare literature reviews and will complete an individual final research project. The course requires no previous study of development economics, but knowledge of the canonical deveIOpinent literature would be uscfol. To register for this section, email Nicki at vrzdgrbnyucdu for your access code. *****$**$**$*****$$********$*****$$**$***************$$****$**$ There WILL be revisions to the fall course listings, so check with the department (998—8900 or 998~ 8933 or 998-8923) as September approaches to keep up to date. **********$*************$****$*********************$***$*********$***************** VI. WHAT IS THE “SPECIAL PROJECT” COURSE? Since fall 2003, the "SPECIAL PROJECT COURSE" ((331.320000) has replaced the thesis requirement. The aim is to improve the quality of support that we offer students in the conduct of original research. The rationale for this course is that over the years we have observed that students require a higher degree of practical guidance in learning how to apply the extensive toolkit of economic techniques that they acquire during their studies in order to solve real-world economic problems. In the final semester of their degree (or second to last semester, in some cases), students will be required to take the course "Special Project in Economic Research". We are offering three sections of “The Special Project in Economic Research Course” in fall 2010 (the course will be offered again in spring 2011 but is not offered during the summer.) Each section is limited to 20 7 students only, so that students can be given individualized attention and feedback on their Work. Please ensure that you register early as this is the absolute limit on class size. To enroll for this course, you must be in the final stages of completing your degree: you need to have completed at least 24 credits of course work (including all the core master’s courses) and have a GPA of at ieast 3.0. You should email Nicki Rivers at vr26@nyu.edu with your UID number and the section you prefer. Nicki will send you the access code so that you can register. Remember that you can register for this course for 1.0 up 2.0 credits (depending on the number of credits you require to make 32 credits for the MA. degree). The aim of the course is to integrate material and tools that have been taught throughout the MA. program in addressing applied economic problems. For example, students may wish to apply their statistical toolkit in the examination of microeconornic questions about changes in market structure. The course meets once a week for two—hours. In the first few weeks, there will be lectures on report" writing, writing a research proposal, literature surveys, hypothesis selection, research design, research methods, constructing and critiquing arguments, and bibliographic and citation practices. There would also be a heavy focus upon the use of the latest research resources (online catalogs and external databases). It should be noted, however, that most of the classroom time in this course will be devoted to guidance and feedback on students' drafts. The professor of the course will give students one or more pre~3pecified topics for writing a "special project report". Students would have a strict timetable to adhere to in the production of the report. The course requires students to write one substantial report (which might in practice comprise one or more term papers). In most cases, the report will include a comprehensive and critical literature survey of a subject as well as either original empirical work or an elaboration of conceptual issues on the same tonic. Students will be encouraged to approach research questions from outside a narrow specialization and to consider iinkages between different fields that they have covered in the course of their studies (eg. the connections betWeen "macroeconomic and business cycle" issues and "money and finance" phenomena). Students will be encouraged to make full use of the services of the Writing Center which is aiso available to provide students with one~on«one assistance in academic writing. (The Writing Center is located at Washington Square.) VII. IMPORTANT REMINDERS 1. “Good Standing”: Active graduate students in the master’s program are either “in good standing” or are on “academic probation”. To be in good standing, the Graduate School requires that students maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 and must have successfully completed 66 percent of credits attempted while at NYU, not including the current semester. Courses with grades of I, IF, N, W, and F are not considered successfully completed. (The Graduate School also encourages Departments to impose additional and stricter standards for “in good standing”) Academic Probation: If academic performance falls below the above standard, students are automatically placed on academic probation and will receive written notification of their probationary status. 2. Incompletes: It is very important that incompletes be made up as quickly as possible in order to receive credit for that course. The assignment of an incomplete grade is at the discretion of the instructor and the Director of Graduate Studies and must be made up Within one year of the beginning of the course. If the incomplete grade is NOT changed to a permanent grade by the instructor within this time period, the incomplete (I) lapses to failure (F). 13ermauent grades may not be changed unless the original grade resulted from clerical error. if you have taken an "incomplete" and find that you will not be able to finish it within the accepted time period, you may file I for an "Extension of Incomplete” with the permission of the instructor. All work must be completed and the grade submitted on the approved "change of grade" form within the second year (maximum). Please see Marge to disenss this option if your instructor agrees to the extension request. 3. Withdrawal from a Course: During the first three weeks of the semester, you may drOp a course withont a "W" appearing on your transcript (however, any tuition refund is in accordance ' with the stated refund schedule m please go to www.nyu.edu/bursar to review the University’s refund schedule). If you drop a course after this, the "W" will appear on your official transcript. You may withdraw from a course up to 24 hours prior to the scheduled final examination. - 4. Maintaining Full-Time Status for Students on F1 and J1 Visas: The Office of International Student Services (0188) is now responsible for assuring INS that students on F1 and J1 visas maintain full-time status each semester. The Economics Department‘s lull-time status policy has not changed significantly. The MA degree program in Economics requires a changing pattern of typical full—time enrollment. The courses and credits per term for the MA program are: first term = 4 courses a 12 credits or more second 2 4 courses = 12 credits or more third = 2 courses = 6 credits or more (plus initial thesis preparation and topic selection) fourth a Special Project w l or 2. credits In general, all students on Fl and J l visas must enroll for no less than the above credits each semester. Excused reductions in the above workload may be granted in exceptional cases only, involving an initial period of adjustment, language difficulty, a documented medical condition or a circumstance that is entirely beyond the student's control. In addition, an excused reduction for anything other than a medical condition will be allowed for only one semester, almost without exception the first semester. For semesters 3 and 4, students will be working on the required MA. special project and in combination with any continuing coursework are expected to work 40 hours per week. Unless an excused reduction is granted, students are allowed a maximum of 2 years in full-time status to complete the MA degree in economics. 5. Maintenance of Matriculation: The Graduate School REQUIRES CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION of its students. Students who have completed their coursework or who are not taking courses for a semester MUST be enrolled in a section of the maintenance course (G47.4747.001) to be eligible for University services and to be in "good standing". You may register for 61474747001 up to the specified time limit of your degree. Students beyond the time limit must secure the Dean's permission to register as a maintainer. *** Master's students who are permanent residents or American citizens MUST COMPLETE their degree WITHIN 5 YEARS of the first term of registration. International students on the F- 1 visa must complete their degree within 4 semesters. (An approved "leave of absence” is considered one of the years within the time innit.) The maintenance fee for 2010-2011 is expected to be $425 per semester plus registration and health fees. Students who enroll and pay for the fall and spring terms are considered enrolled during the summer. Payment of the MM fee entitles you to use the library and other research facilities, consult members of the faculty, and participate in University activities. Once the required University Registration and Services Fee has been paid, students maintaining matriculation may also utilize University Health Services for emergency treatment of an injury or illness, are eligible for the University's Domestic Student Health insurance Program (for a certain period of time), and may join Coles Sports Center (for a nominal fee). Please keep in mind that waivers of the maintenance of matriculation fees for MA students are NON—EXISTENT; therefore, you should plan to finish your course work, special project assignment to graduate in a timely fashion. 6. Leave of Absence: if you have completed all coursework, have a GPA of at least 3.0, and are obliged to withdraw from the University temporarily for national service, serious illness, or compelling personal reasons, you may request an official leave of absence (in writing). If granted, an "official leave" relieves you of liability for maintenance fees for the period of absence and assures readmission at the end of the leave. However, the leave is considered one of the years within the five year time limit. Also please note that any student who fails to register for one full academic year (Fall, Spring and Summer! MUST APPLY FOR RIB-ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. Students are also responsible for the payment of all fees during this period. THERE ARE NO EXCEPTIONS. 7. Phi). Level Courses: From time to time, suitably qualified MA. students may seek to take one or two PhD—level courses within the Department of Economics as credit towards their MA. degree. Although the Department will attempt to accommodate students' interests and needs, MA. students should note that permission to take Pthlevel courses is at the discretion of the Department. There is no automatic entitlement to take i3hDu1evei classes once admitted to the MA. program. Because class sizes in the PhD program are restricted, only the best qualified MA. students will be granted permission to take PhD classes. Consequently, in order for us to assess all applications together, permission will often not be given until the first week of term, when we have a clear idea of the spaces still available in the PhD classes and the number of MA students applying to take them. In addition, it . is very unlikely that permission will be given your first semester because you have no academic track record at N.Y.U. For those students who may wish to apply/to take a PhD-level course, you must complete the Form MA/3. 8. EwMail Distribution and Mailing Lists: The efficient running of the program means that we must be able to contact you, sometimes at short notice. If you change your address and/or phone number, please enter your new information via ALBERT. You should also notify Nicki Rivers of these changes so that departmental records can be updated to ensure that you receive department mail and messages in a timely fashion. Please note that all emails sent by the department will be going to your NYU NetID e—mail account. You should also keep in mind that all non-immigrants in the US. over 30 days are required to notify the INS of any change of address within ten (10) days of moving. This is NOT a new policy, 10 but is now being enforced. The procedure is very simple and there is no fee. The change of address form can be downloaded from the INS web site. It is form AR—Ii and can be obtained at http://WW.ins.gov/graphics/forrnsfee/forms/files/ar—ll.pdfi 9. Graduate Commons: GSAS has designated Room 120 in the Silver Building, £00 Washington Square East as the Graduate Commons. This spacious room is available to all students in GSAS for the purposes of relaxing, reading, and studying between classes. You must have a valid NYU 11) card in order to gain entry to this room. 10. Graduation Deadlines: if you are planning to graduate on September 27, 2010, and have not yet filed for graduation, you are late and should contact the Office of the Registrar immediately. If you are planning to graduate on January 24, 2011, you must apply for graduation via Albert between June 14 and October I, 2918. Once you have applied, the Registrar will generate a "check sheet" listing whether you have met all requirements for the degree. If you are not able to complete everything by the specified deadlines, you should file for the next graduation date. Remember: in order to graduate from GSAS, you must have completed 32 points of graduate credit (at least 23—24 points in residence in Economics at the Graduate School), have a CUMULATIVE GRADE i’OINT AVERAGE OF 3.9 (B), and 18 points with grades of "B" (3.0) or better. THIS MEANS THAT GRADES OF "3-" OR LESS WILL NOT BE COUNTEI) TOWARD THIS REQUIREMENT. ' VII. JOB LISTINGS: The Department receives occasional requests from employers which are sent via email to those iisted on the MA Distribution List. VIII. FALL 2010 Graduate Economics Course Listing: Please find attachedthe iatest version of the fall 2010 listing of our graduate economics courses. Changes are expected so please check periodically with the department and at the Registrar’s site www.nyuedu/registrar for the latest infonnation. **************$$***********$*=i¢*>l¢$>l=*=i=**$=l==k=i=**$***************$*$****$****$***$** The following information and forms can be found at the department web site www.myuedu/econ “MA Program”: Stern Course Reservation Form _ Form MA/Z “Permission to take course outside of Economics Department ...’ Form MAB “Permission ...to take PhD—level course in the Econ Department “Usefiil Information for New MA Students” 13. 7/22/2010 Department of Economics - New York University PLEASE NOTE: MA STUDENTS MAY NOT REGISTER FOR PhD COURSES UNLESS THEY HAVE WRITTEN i’ERMISSION FROM DR. HARPER (DGS—MA Program), the COURSE INSTRUCTOR & DR. DEBRAJ RAY (DGS—PhD Program). GRABUATE COURSE SCHEDULE FALL 2010 MA. and 00.0. (TENTATIVE) .311! i’rofessor 031.1001-01 NLA. Math for Economists 'l‘isch/ LC 11 6:20-8:20 Hodge 30352 'l‘isch/ LC 1 l 8:30—10:00 pm G31.1001~01§ M.A. 31301 Math for Economists Recitation , > > > . > ? 631.1001~02 Math for Economists Silver 414 4:55-6:45 Arkoriac 30353 (3311000012 - Math for Beonomists Recitation Silver 414 7:00~8:30 31302 Macroeconomic Theory G31.1005-01 M.A 30354 G31.1005-011 . . 31303 -- 30355 (1311005021 v - 31304 30356 ' 30357 30358 30359 30360 “I 30361 ‘ i’h.D. Macroeconomics'fhcor I 4 W mm” III-IIIIMHI III-MIII 30362 PM). Macroeconomlc Theo I LAB F 19 W 4th n 517 9:30-11:30 Biio, Saki Silver 414 6:20-8:20 Silver 414 8:30-10:00 Silver 414 6:208:20 Silver 414 8:30-10:00 19 W 4th” 517 Mw2z00-4:00 Wilson, Charles w=1:00-3:00 19 W 4 — 517 6:00-8:00 Yildiz, Kcmal 19 W 4 — 517 9:30—11:30 Rubinstein {Bisin KMBC—44 W 4' /5-85 3:30—5:30 Yuicsei, chi Leahy/ 19 w 4th — 517 10:00-12:00 L'uny vist Macro Theory Recitation Macroeconomic Theory Macro T110013! Recitation Macroeconomic Theory 11 Math for Economists 1 W starts A0031: 31 Math for Economists 1 LAB Microeconomic Theory 1 Micl‘oeconomlc Theo E (LAB R Hflflflflflflflflflflfll illiill'fifiifiigi 30363 ' G31.1101~02 30364 3» .> .> 1» AB u 30365 nu 30366 LAB Daniel (331140201 Money and Banking Waverly 366 6:20—8:20 Skoorka 30368 MA. 19 w 4“— 736 1000-100 Ray, Dciaraj 19W4“»—624 10004200 l9W4“m736 1000-1200 19 w 4“ -624 2:05-4:05 “ TR T=19 W 61‘ ‘ ~51? 12230-230 Mcnzcl/Jcnish R: 19 w 4‘h-730 Applied Statistics & Econometrics I n TBA ' 8:25~10:25 pm Dong, Baiyu L G31.1101-03 ‘ 30369 G31.160l-0l 30370 30372 30373 30374 G3 12100—01 30375 International Econ 1 (Tladc) . Econometrics I 4 .3; CU i G31.l 108-01 P1131] Income Distribution in U S 4 19 W 4‘ -802 10:00—12:00 Wolff 3036‘? ‘. . _ PhD. Econometrics I LAB Chen, Ian-er 30376 30377 i’h.D. 19 W4‘ —736 1230200 19 1114‘ M736 10:00-12:00 031211401 19 W4‘ «736 ' 1250230 30378 19W4‘ w517 2:004:00 30380 Topics: New Research in Econ Theory 19 W 4”“ — 624 4: 15—6115 M“30384 (must attend both terms to earn 4 pts but officiaii enroll for either fall 0R 8 rin Topics in Economics: Topics in 19 w 40 — 517 6:15»8:15 30385 PILD. A lieri Microeconometrics MNA. Politics w- CANCELLED ?hi} Topics in Economics: Industrial 4 " Stcrm’44 W 4‘“! 3:06—6:00 Bar-isaacf 30387 ' 0r anization same as 330.3360 —? KM 1305—85 Askcr MA. 3 25 w 4‘*‘/ (3-10 6:20-8:20 ‘ Yoruimazcr 30388 ' 30389 G31.300i-07 Topics in Econ: Psychology & Econ both terms to et full credit 30391 30392 1111.1), both terms to earn 4 pts but officiaily enroil for either fall 0R spring (33130034110 Topics: Advanced Macroeconomics 30393 Theory I (Game Theory) Sadzik Bxperimentai Economics I Schotter Advanced Macroeconomics I Vioiante Ray, Debraj Wiswall x "*5 ? TBA TBA TBA 19WI-1t «~51? M 2:30-4:30 Caplin 19 W 4' — 802 6:208:20 Prager 19 W 4th — 624 12:00—12:00 Gertier/Midrigan &F 19 w 4"‘436 10:00~12:00 3U Kehoe lSargent R=19 W 4“ “624 R=2100~3 :30 (3313000011 30394 RF Gailant, Ron PhD Topics in Economics: Advanced F=19 W401 ~ 517 F=l100~3:00 Econometrics (Computation & Econometrics Topics in Political Economy G3i.3002-01 PILD. Seminar in Article Preparation 31270 3‘” yr must attend both terms to cart: 4 pts but only officially enroll for either fall OR spring 'l‘opics: Law, Econ & Poi Colloquium 1.9 w 4*“002 12:00am; 1.3 Persico IG31.3001-012 30395 19 w 4“ u 517 1200-200 Wang, Shing~ Yi 2 Vanderbilt! 202 Komhanser/ Ferej olm 4:00-5:50 (some as 1.06.353 l )~2 seats open G3 E 3002-02 PILDJ M30396 MA. (3313002433 NLAJ Topics: Econ. Analysis of Property & 31271 Ph D Contract Law (Phi) students may take WI ' ' permission of instructor + 1 pt. R&R) 19 w 4‘" — 624 4:10-6:10 Harper .33 ?’t':: III-“II”! I“: (331-3002—04 Topics in Econ: Advanced W? 19 W rim-80%? 104231 TBA 31272 Econometrics I G31.3002~05 Topics in Economics: Tracking the US. 3 n 19W4“-624 6:20-3:20 31273 Econom ‘ 31274 Econometricsi MA (131300207 191040-736 6:30-8:40 Wilson, c. 31275 Microeconomics (3313002418 Topicsin Economics: Advanced 19W4l-624 6:00—8:00 ThomKevin 31305 Mathematical Economics 31306 MA. Theo 19 W 4‘ w 517 4:00—5:30 Fearce Workshop in Microeconomic Theory Research Workshop in Macroeconomic Research “30397 - M60398 P111). _ G3 1 3007—01 FILD. Appiied Microeconomics Workshop “39399 19 W 4” - 517 Sargent/Clementi 4:. “IIIII 3“ 4:30~6:00 19 W 4‘ - 517 4:15-5:30 Wiswail m Seminar in Econometrics “30488 G313 103~0I CESS Experimental Economics W G3 I 3402-01 Colloquium on Market Enstitutions & M39405 MA. Economic Processes M31276 M30382 Ph.D. W “30383 Special Projects in Economic Research M30482 M30403 RR ' MMforMA n M War II mu ll WI] Ell E Xxxxxxxxx Xxxxxxxxx XXXXXXXXX II ...
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