08.04.11.Thursday (2)

08.04.11.Thursday (2) - Word Roots: Classics 30 Thursday,...

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Thursday, August 4, 2011 Word Roots: Classics 30
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The Quiz 1. Write your name LEGIBLY, Last name, First_name. 2. Write “1” in the blank “TEST NO.” 3. Write the date. 4. Write your ID number and bubble it in carefully and fully. (If you don’t know your ID accurately, don t write anything here , and tell me that as you hand in your quiz). 5. Bubble the corret letter in the “TEST FORM” section.
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Next Week’s Schedule Originally, I had said that I would put next week’s schedule in this PowerPoint. However, I have decided to instead post it in the “Resources” section of the SmartSite. It will appear later today.
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Today’s Goals To go over today’s homework. To learn more about the Greek alphabet. To look at online dictionaries. To look at some grammar: transitive and intransitive verbs indirect objects
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More on Greek Writing: Breathings Words that begin with vowels in Greek always have a breathing written over their beginning. A breathing is a little mark that looks like like an apostrophe.
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More on Greek Writing: Accents Most Greek words have an accent mark over one of their syllables. There are three kinds: We won’t worry about accents in this course. They are complicated, not clearly understood, and not important for our purposes. Just be aware of them.
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More on Greek Writing: Diphthongs Diphthongs (from Greek di- , “double,” and phthongos , “sound”) are two vowels that blend into one sound. Here the common Greek diphthongs:
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More on Greek Writing: Nasalized Gamma When gamma comes before another gamma or before a kappa, a chi, or a xi (these are all pronounced in the same place in the mouth as gamma), it is pronounced “ng” as in “sing .” We call it nasalized because it is pronounced through the nose. In English, we write this sound with an “n” (in this, we are copying the Romans, who changed these gammas into ‘n’ when they borrowed words from Greek).
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More on Greek Writing: theta, phi, and chi The Greeks had two “k” sounds, two “p” sounds, and two “t” sounds. [Native English-speakers have trouble hearing the difference since they use
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This note was uploaded on 08/14/2011 for the course CLA 030 taught by Professor Rundin during the Spring '11 term at UC Davis.

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08.04.11.Thursday (2) - Word Roots: Classics 30 Thursday,...

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