14. Using Visuals in Written and Oral Communication

14. Using Visuals in Written and Oral Communication -...

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Using Visuals in Written  and Oral Communication
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Note: This presentation will intermix tips and  rules for both written documents and  presentations like Power Points
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Some thoughts on the physical  appearance of your documents and  document design
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Purpose of Good Document Design Help the reader identify and locate important  information. Page numbers should be easy to find Table of contents should identify all major sections  and subsections Visuals should be labeled and located close to their  mention in the text.
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Layout and Design becomes a roadmap  to lead the reader through the arguments  in the document
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Layout and Design Make even complex material Look accessible Give readers a favorable impression of you and your  organization Use compatible fonts and the same highlighting  device for similar items in the document
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Design should reveal difference between Topics and subtopics Primary and secondary information General points and examples that support those points Make information easy to find Project the appropriate image of the organization
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Typography - definitions Font – a complete set of letters and symbols available  in a single typeface Serif  - small projections at the end of each stroke in a  letter   -   ABCdef Sans serif – without the serif  ABCdef Point size for printed documents 8 point  - For footnotes 10 point  – Headers and footers 12 point  – Main text 14 point  – section headings
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Type Face Has greatest influence on your document San serif vs.   serif Sans serif – no “feet” – good for headings and where good distinct letters are important Serif – “feet” – mind forms words from feet text documents with serif are easier to read I prefer 12 point  Times New Roman in my writing
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Using Typographical Tools Not more than 3 fonts in a single page To highlight differences between  headings  and  text , use distinctly different fonts Serif   fonts –  are easier to read in written document Sans serif - fonts are easier to read on the web and  in Power Points
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This note was uploaded on 08/14/2011 for the course BUS 100 taught by Professor Moshiri during the Spring '08 term at UC Riverside.

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14. Using Visuals in Written and Oral Communication -...

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